Coronavirus Update for April 8, 2020

The following is the latest information from federal regulators as of 4:15 p.m. on Wednesday, April 8.

NASH Writes to the Administration and Congress

Yesterday NASH wrote to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services administrator Seema Verma asking them to include private safety-net hospitals among the health care providers receiving funds under the second round of grants to be awarded to hospitals and health care providers under the CARES Act.

NASH also wrote yesterday to congressional leaders and key committee leaders asking them to include additional funding for hospitals and health care providers in any future COVID-19-related legislation.

Both letters are attached and will be posted on the NASH web site tomorrow

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

CMS has issued a news release announcing that it has approved approximately $34 billion for providers through its Accelerated and Advance Payment Program, which was created in the CARES Act.

Department of Health and Human Services

The Department of Health and Human Services has awarded $1.3 billion to 1387 health centers to help communities detect, prevent, diagnose, and treat COVID-19.  See an interactive map that shows the centers awarded grants here.

Food and Drug Administration

Federal Emergency Management Agency

FEMA has posted a notice that it is issuing a temporary rule to allocate certain scarce or threatened materials for domestic use so that these materials may not be exported from the U.S. without the agency’s explicit approval.  These items include ventilators, personal protective equipment, and materials used to make personal protective equipment.

Federal Funding Opportunities for Hospitals

NASH has prepared a document that collects and presents in one place the various new federal funding opportunities for hospitals resulting from legislation addressing the COVID-19 public health emergency.  Find that document here.

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Coronavirus Update for April 7, 2020

The following is the latest information from federal regulators and others as of 4:15 p.m. on Tuesday, April 7.

Department of Labor

The Department of Labor has published an advisory on unemployment insurance provisions of the CARES Act.  While the advisory memo is directed to state workforce agencies, it includes detailed information about program eligibility and benefits.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

  • The Families First Coronavirus Response Act (the second major COVID-19 bill, adopted March 18) waives cost-sharing under Medicare Part B (coinsurance and deductible amounts) for Medicare patients for COVID-19 testing-related services. The latest edition of the CMS publication MLN Matters summarizes the services for which cost-sharing is waived, the types of providers to which the waived cost-sharing applies, and the coding those providers need to do to get paid.  Find the explanation here.
  • CMS has published a “Dear Clinician” letter with guidance for physicians that they may bill for e-visits for both existing and new patients; previously published guidance suggested that they could bill only for existing patients but this policy has been revised. The letter also offers guidance for how to code such telehealth visits.
  • CMS has updated its recommendations for non-emergent elective medical services and treatment. These recommendations supersede previous guidelines.
  • Earlier today CMS hosted a call to discuss CMS waivers and COVID-19 response. Find the slides used during that presentation here.
  • CMS will hold a special open door forum tomorrow, April 8, at 1:30 p.m. to discuss its actions to improve access to telehealth during the COVID-19 crisis. This one-hour call is open to everyone:  the dial-in number is 1-888-455-1397, the passcode is 3535324, and participants are asked to call in at 1:15 p.m.
  • On April 3, CMS Administrator Seema Verma, Deborah Birx, MD, White House Coronavirus Task Force, and officials from the FDA, CDC, and FEMA participated in a call on COVID-19 flexibilities. During the call physicians presented best practices from their COVID-19 experiences.

Food and Drug Administration

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The CDC will soon be providing $186 million in funding for additional resources for state and local jurisdictions to support their response to the COVID-19 emergency.  Funding will be for lab equipment, supplies, staff, and more for areas considered “hot zones” for COVID-19 and to enhance COVID-19 surveillance and tracking.  The news release announcing this new funding notes that “CDC will use existing networks to reach out to state and local jurisdictions to access this initial funding.”

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

SAMHSA will fund $110 million in emergency grants to provide treatment for substance use disorders/serious mental illness during the coronavirus pandemic.  The purpose of the emergency grants is to provide crisis intervention services, mental and substance use disorder treatment, and other related recovery supports for children and adults, with funding to be provided to states, territories, and tribes.

Department of Health and Human Services

HHS has announced that it will purchase for the Strategic National Stockpile the new COVID-19 test that produces results in less than 13 minutes.  HHS will provide the tests to public health labs in every state and territory and to Indian Health Services sites.

White House

President Trump has signed a memorandum directing the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security to make available the National Guard to the states of Georgia, Hawaii, Indiana, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Ohio, Rhode Island, Tennessee, and Texas and the territory of the U.S. Virgin Island to provide emergency assistance with addressing the COVID-19 crisis and for the Federal Emergency Management Agency to pay 100 percent of the cost of such assistance.

National Association of Medicaid Directors

The National Association of Medicaid Directors has written to CMS and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) urging them “…to allow states to make retainer payments to essential Medicaid providers through Section 1115 waivers during this emergency.”  See the letter here.

Federal Funding Opportunities for Hospitals

NASH has prepared a document that collects and presents in one place the various new federal funding opportunities for hospitals resulting from legislation addressing the COVID-19 public health emergency.  Find that document here.

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Coronavirus Update for April 6, 2020

The following is the latest information from federal regulators and others as of 4:30 p.m. on Monday, April 6.

Federal Funding Opportunities for Hospitals

NASH has prepared a document that collects and presents in one place the various new federal funding opportunities for hospitals resulting from legislation addressing the COVID-19 public health emergency.  Find that document here.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Food and Drug Administration

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

OSHA has provided interim guidance to its regional administrators and state plan designees regarding enforcement discretion to permit the extended use and reuse of respirators, and respirators that are beyond their manufacturers’ recommended shelf life during the COVID-19 emergency.

Department of Health and Human Services/Office of the Inspector General

  • The OIG has issued a policy statement regarding the application of certain administrative enforcement authorities due to the COVID-19 crisis.  This statement conveys that the OIG will not impose sanctions under anti-kickback laws related to actions by health care providers that fit under the HHS’s previous waiver of the physician self-referral provisions of the Stark law.  The OIG also has launched a new FAQ on this policy statement to provide additional information.
  • The OIG conducted a national survey of hospitals, asking them about the challenges and needs they faced.  See a summary of the survey results here and the full report here.

The White House

During Friday’s coronavirus task force press briefing, national coronavirus response coordinator Deborah Birx, M.D. explained the priority in the distribution of the new COVID-19 test that yields results in 15 minutes.

American Medical Association

The American Medical Association has issued its own “guiding principles” for the protection of current medical students and medical students:  those who are graduating early to help in the fight against COVID-19 and those who are being enlisted, while still in medical school, to participate in the direct care of COVID-19 and suspected COVID-19 patients.

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Coronavirus Update for April 3, 2020

The following is the latest information from federal regulators and others as of 4:30 p.m. on Friday, April 3.

NASH Writes to Secretary Azar

NASH has written to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar asking him to distribute, as soon as possible, the $100 billion designated in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the CARES Act) for hospitals and health care providers.  See NASH’s letter to Secretary Azar here.

Department of Labor

The Labor Department has published a program letter with a summary of key unemployment insurance provisions of the CARES Act and guidance regarding temporary emergency state staffing flexibility.

Federal Communications Commission

The FCC has adopted a $200 million telehealth program to support provider responding to the COVID-19 crisis.  The money will help providers purchase telecommunications, broadband connectivity, and devices necessary for providing telehealth services.  See the FCC’s news release and its formal report and order.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Food and Drug Administration

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Department of Health and Human Services

  • HHS’s Office of Civil Rights has announced that it will not impose penalties for violations of certain provisions of the HIPAA privacy rule against health care providers or their business associates for the good faith uses and disclosures of protected health information by business associates for public health and health oversight activities during the COVID-19 nationwide public health emergency.  See the Office of Civil Rights announcement of this temporary policy and a pre-publication version of the formal notice of this policy that will appear shortly in the Federal Register.
  • Along with the Department of Justice, HHS has announced that the two agencies have ordered the distribution of medical supplies that in their judgment were being hoarded.  The federal government paid fair market value for 192,000 N95 masks, nearly 600,000 pairs of medical grade gloves, and 130,000 other types of masks, surgical gowns, disinfectant towels, and other supplies and is sending these supplies to the New Jersey Department of Health, the New York state Department of Health and the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

The White House

President Trump has invoked the Defense Production Act to compel companies to undertake the manufacture of N95 respirators and ventilators.

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NASH Asks Azar to Distribute CARES Act Money Now

“Distribute as soon as possible the $100 billion designated in the [CARES] Act to assist health care providers as they deal head-on with the biggest public health crisis our country has faced in more than a century,” NASH asked Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar in a letter to Azar on Friday.

In the letter, the National Alliance of Safety-Net Hospitals wrote of private safety-net hospitals tackling the COVID-19 crisis that

Hospitals and other providers need these resources – and need them in a very timely manner. Hospitals invested heavily in preparations for the challenge to come and are still paying for those and continuing investments at a time when their cash flow is at an historic low because they are no longer performing elective surgery, which provides a major portion of their revenue. Thus, hospitals need this money to pay our bills, to keep the lights on and the medical supplies coming in, and to pay our courageous caregivers.

See NASH’s letter to Secretary Azar here.

Coronavirus Update: April 2, 2020

The following is the latest information from federal regulators and others as of 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 2.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Department of Health and Human Services

The department’s Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality will be spending $7.5 million to evaluate health system response to the COVID-19 pandemic.  The money is divided into two pools:  $5 million to evaluate innovations and challenges in rapidly expanding telehealth in response to COVID-19 and $2.5 million to active agency grant recipients and cooperative agreements.

Federal Emergency Management Agency

Food and Drug Administration

For researchers, the FDA has developed quality-controlled reference sequence data for the SARS-CoV-2 reference strain in the U.S.

Department of Labor

The Department of Labor has published a temporary rule describing the benefits under the Emergency Paid Sick Leave Act and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion Act, both of which were part of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which was signed into law on March 18.  The law reimburses private employers with fewer than 500 employees with tax credits for the cost of providing employees with paid leave for specific reasons related to COVID-19.  The law enables employers to keep their workers on their payrolls while also ensuring that workers are not forced to choose between their paychecks and public health measures.  For more, see a Department of Labor news release describing the new temporary rule and view the rule itself here.

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Coronavirus Update: April 1, 2020

Coronavirus Update: April 1, 2020.

Medicaid DSH

The following is a revised schedule of Medicaid DSH allotment cuts.

  Before CARES After CARES
FFY 2020 $4 Billion $0
FFY 2021 $8 Billion $4 Billion
FFY 2022 $8 Billion $8 Billion
FFY 2023 $8 Billion $8 Billion
FFY 2024 $8 Billion $8 Billion
FFY 2025 $8 Billion $8 Billion
Total $44 Billion $36 Billion

 

Centers for Disease Control Prevention

The CDC has updated its guidance on responsible actions when among people who have been or may have been exposed to COVID-19.

Food and Drug Administration

The FDA has updated its reporting on the steps it is taking to accelerate the development of novel therapies for COVID-19 through its Coronavirus Treatment Acceleration Program.

The FDA has updated its list of current and resolved drug shortages and continuations.  There are currently 148 drugs on the list.  Yesterday the FDA posted information regarding shortages of hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine due to a significant surge in demand.

The FDA has issued two additional emergency use authorizations for COVID-19 diagnostics, for a total of 22 authorized tests.

State Department

The State Department has posted a message for foreign medical professionals with approved U.S. non-immigrant or immigrant visa petitions or certificates of eligibility in approved exchange visitor programs or who are already in the U.S. and would like to apply to stay.

The Joint Commission

The Joint Commission has posted a notice expressing support for permitting health care workers to bring their own standard face masks or respirators to use at work when their employers cannot “routinely provide access to protective equipment…”

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Coronavirus Update: March 31, 2020

Coronavirus Update: March 31, 2020.

Yesterday the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) published a major update of Medicare and Medicaid regulations that included blanket waivers of a large number of Medicare and Medicaid regulations and requirements.  The following is a summary of the major aspects of this new regulation.

New Policies and Waivers From Medicare and Medicaid Regulations and Requirements

CMS has introduced dozens of changes that involve waivers from current regulations and requirements.  A comprehensive, 26-page CMS document describing these changes can be found here and below are the highlights organized into four broad categories:

  • increasing hospital capacity (what CMS calls “hospitals without walls”)
  • expanding the health care workforce
  • increasing the use of telehealth in Medicare
  • reducing paperwork

Increasing Hospital Capacity

  • CMS is waiving the enforcement of section 1867(a) of EMTALA to permit hospitals to screen patients at off-site locations to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.
  • CMS is waiving certain requirements under the Medicare conditions of participation allow for flexibilities during hospital and psychiatric hospital surges, permitting non-hospital buildings/space to be used for patient care and quarantine sites.
  • For the duration of the public health emergency, CMS is waiving certain requirements under the Medicare conditions of participation and the provider-based department requirements to permit hospitals to establish and operate as part of the hospital any location meeting those conditions of participation for hospitals that continue to apply during the public health emergency. This waiver also permits hospitals to change the status of their current provider-based department locations to the extent necessary to address the needs of hospital patients.
  • CMS is waiving requirements to permit acute-care hospitals to house acute-care inpatients in excluded distinct part units, such as excluded distinct part unit inpatient rehabilitation facilities or inpatient psychiatric facilities, where the distinct part unit’s beds are appropriate for acute-care inpatients.
  • CMS is permitting acute-care hospitals with excluded distinct part inpatient psychiatric units to relocate inpatients from the excluded distinct part psychiatric unit to acute-care beds and units as a result of a disaster or emergency.
  • CMS is permitting acute-care hospitals with excluded distinct part inpatient rehabilitation units that, as a result of a disaster or emergency, need to relocate inpatients from the excluded distinct part rehabilitation unit to an acute-care bed and unit.
  • CMS is waiving certain physical environment requirements. Provided that the state has approved the location as one that sufficiently addresses safety and comfort for patients and staff, CMS is waiving requirements to allow for a non-skilled nursing facility building to be temporarily certified and available for use by a skilled nursing facility in the event there are needs for isolation processes for COVID-19-positive residents, which may not be feasible in the existing skilled nursing facility structure to ensure care and services during treatment for COVID-19 are available while protecting other vulnerable adults.
  • CMS is waiving certain conditions of participation and certification requirements for opening a nursing facility if the state determines there is a need to quickly stand up a temporary COVID-19 isolation and treatment location.
  • CMS is waiving requirements to temporarily allow for rooms in a long-term care facility not normally used as a resident’s room to be used to accommodate beds and residents for resident care in emergencies and situations needed to help with surge capacity.

Expanding the Health Care Workforce

  • CMS is waiving current requirements to permit physicians whose privileges will expire to continue practicing at the hospital and for new physicians to be able to practice before full medical staff/governing body review and approval to address workforce concerns related to COVID-19.  CMS also is waiving requirements about details of the credentialing and privileging process.
  • CMS is waiving the requirement that Medicare patients be under the care of a physician.
  • CMS is waiving requirements that a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) work under the supervision of a physician. CRNA supervision will be at the discretion of the hospital and state law.
  • CMS is waiving the requirement that a skilled nursing facility and nursing facility may not employ anyone for longer than four months unless they meet current training and certification requirements. CMS is not waiving the requirement that such facilities ensure that nurse aides are able to demonstrate competency in skills and techniques necessary to care for residents’ needs.
  • CMS is waiving the requirement that physicians and non-physician practitioners must perform in-person visits for nursing home residents and will permit visits to be conducted, as appropriate, via telehealth options.
  • CMS is temporarily waiving requirements that out-of-state practitioners be licensed in the state where they are providing services when they are licensed in another state. CMS will waive the physician or non-physician practitioner licensing requirements when the following four conditions are met:
    • must be enrolled as such in the Medicare program;
    • must possess a valid license to practice in the state which relates to his or her Medicare enrollment;
    • is furnishing services – whether in person or via telehealth – in a state in which the emergency is occurring to contribute to relief efforts in his or her professional capacity; and,
    • is not affirmatively excluded from practice in the state or any other state that is part of the 1135 emergency area.
    • This does not have the effect of waiving state or local licensure requirements or any requirement specified by the state or a local government as a condition for waiving its licensure requirements.
  • CMS has a toll-free hotline for physicians and non-physician practitioners and Part A-certified providers and suppliers establishing isolation facilities to enroll and receive temporary Medicare billing privileges. CMS is waiving the following screening requirements:
    • application fee,
    • criminal background checks associated with fingerprint-based criminal background checks,
    • site visits,
    • postpone all revalidation actions,
    • allow licensed providers to render services outside of their state of enrollment,
    • expedite any pending or new applications from providers,
    • allow physicians and other practitioners to render telehealth services from their home without reporting their home address on their Medicare enrollment while continuing to bill from their currently enrolled location, and
    • allow opted-out physicians and non-physician practitioners to terminate their opt-out status early and enroll in Medicare to provide care to more patients.
  • CMS has issued blanket waivers of sanctions under the Stark Act.  The blanket waivers may be used now without notifying CMS.  Individual waivers of sanctions under section 1877(g) of the Act may be granted upon request.  For more information, go here and here.

Increasing the Use of Telehealth in Medicare

  • CMS is waiving the requirement that physicians and non-physician practitioners must perform in-person visits for nursing home residents and will permit visits to be conducted, as appropriate, via telehealth options.
  • Clinicians can provide virtual check-in services to new and established patients.
  • CMS will pay for telephone evaluation and management services provided by physicians and the same services provided by qualified non-physician health care providers. These services may be used for telephone-only evaluation and management services.
  • Licensed clinical social workers, clinical psychologists, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech language pathologists can perform e-visits via telehealth.
  • Limits have been lifted for subsequent inpatient visits, subsequent skilled nursing visits, and critical care consult codes.
  • Physicians may provide supervision virtually using real-time audio/visual technology for services that require direct supervision by a physician or other type of practitioner.
  • For additional information on new flexibilities in the use of telehealth for Medicare patients, go here.

Reducing Paperwork

  • CMS is waiving various requirements that limit and define the use and documentation of verbal orders in a hospital.
  • CMS is waiving reporting requirements when patients who have passed away required soft restraints prior to their death.  If restraints were a factor in the death, the usual reporting requirements apply.
  • CMS is waiving the current requirements for providing “detailed information” in discharge planning as long as discharging hospitals continue to provide the data patients and their families need to make decisions about appropriate post-acute care.  This does not waive the requirement that patients have all of the necessary medical information they need for their post-acute setting.
  • While maintaining the discharge planning requirements that ensure that patients are discharged to an appropriate setting with the necessary medical information, CMS is waiving some of the specific components of discharge information acute-care hospitals are ordinarily required to provide.
  • CMS is waiving requirements involving the organization and staffing of medical records departments and requirements for the form and content of medical records and is allowing for flexibility in completion of medical records within 30 days following discharge from a hospital.
  • CMS is waiving the requirements for hospitals to provide information about their advance directive policies to patients.
  • CMS is waiving the requirement that hospitals participating in Medicare and Medicaid must have a utilization review plan that meets specified requirements. CMS is waiving the entire utilization review condition of participation.
  • CMS is waiving – for “surge facilities” only – the requirement that the emergency services function operate according to written policies and procedures during surge periods.
  • CMS is waiving the requirement that hospital emergency preparedness policies and procedures include specified elements for the emergency preparedness communication plans of hospitals when a hospital is a surge site.
  • CMS is waiving requirements for hospital quality assessment and performance improvement programs that address the scope of the program, the incorporation and setting of priorities for the program’s performance improvement activities, and integrated quality assurance and performance improvement programs. The requirement that hospitals maintain an effective, ongoing, hospital-wide, data-driven quality assessment and performance improvement program remains.
  • CMS is waiving the requirement that providers must have a current therapeutic diet manual approved by the dietitian and medical staff readily available to all medical, nursing, and food service personnel. Such manuals would not need to be maintained at surge capacity sites.
  • CMS is waiving the requirement for nursing staffs to develop and keep current a nursing care plan for each patient and to have policies and procedures in place establishing which outpatient departments are not required to have a registered nurse present.
  • Completed 2019 Occupational Mix Surveys, Hospital Reporting Form CMS-10079, for the Wage Index Beginning FY 2022, are due to the Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs). CMS is granting an extension for hospitals nationwide affected by COVID-19 until August 3, 2020.
  • CMS is waiving requirements that govern pre-admission screening and annual resident review (PASARR) to permit states and nursing homes to suspend these assessments for new residents for 30 days. After 30 days, new patients admitted to nursing homes with a mental illness or intellectual disability should receive the assessment as soon as resources become available.
  • CMS is waiving many paperwork requirements for home health agencies, skilled nursing facilities, nursing facilities, end-stage renal dialysis facilities, home health agencies, and hospices. Find those changes here (pages 9-16).
  • Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs) and Qualified Independent Contractors (QICs) in the fee-for-service program may allow extensions to file an appeal. CMS is allowing MACs and QICs in the fee-for-service program and the MA and Part D independent review entities (IREs) to:
    • waive requests for timeliness requirements for additional information to adjudicate appeals;
    • process appeals even with incomplete appointment of representation forms;
    • process requests for appeals that do not meet the required elements using information that is available; and
    • use all flexibilities available in the appeal process if good cause requirements are satisfied.

Others

  • CMS offers stakeholders examples of section 1135 waivers available to individual providers.  Find those examples here beginning on page 23.
  • CMS is waiving certain patient rights involving copies of medical records, patient visitation limits, and quarantine processes in states that have had more than 50 confirmed COVID-19 cases.

For further information:

To learn more about these changes, you may wish to consult the following resources:

The following is the latest information from the administration and federal regulators as of 4:30 today.

The White House

President Trump has issued a presidential memorandum to the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Homeland Security authorizing the use of the National Guard to provide COVID-19-related services to the states of Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Michigan, with the federal government to pay 100 percent of the cost of such a deployment.  The federal assumption of 100 percent of this cost expires in 30 days.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Department of Health and Human Services

The Department of Health and Human Services has posted a news release in which it outlines the steps it has taken and will be taking to accelerate clinical trials for possible COVID-19 vaccines and to prepare for the manufacture of approved vaccines.

U.S. Public Health Service

The U.S. Public Health Service has issued a letter on optimizing ventilator use during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Food and Drug Administration

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Coronavirus Update for March 30, 2020

NASH’s coronavirus update for March 30, 2020 as of 4:15 today.

The White House

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Department of Health and Human Services

The HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) published a statement regarding the discretion the OIG will employ when investigating any conduct during this emergency that may be subject to OIG administrative enforcement. The office also advised providers to contact the OIG for extension of any OIG investigation deadlines during this time.

Food and Drug Administration

Department of Veterans Affairs

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has published its emergency response plan for the COVID-19 emergency.

Environmental Protection Agency

The EPA has published a memo outlining the discretion it intends to exercise in fulfilling its inspection and compliance efforts during the COVID-19 emergency.

Department of Homeland Security

In a new document with guidance on the essential critical infrastructure workforce, the Department of Homeland Security specifies essential jobs within the workforce during the COVID-19 emergency.

 

 

 

Coronavirus Update: March 27, 2020

Coronavirus Update: March 27, 2020:  The following is the latest information from Congress, federal regulators, and others as of 4:00 p.m. on Friday, March 27.

Congress

The House of Representatives passed the $2 trillion Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act passed by the Senate late Wednesday.  It now goes to the president for his signature and he has indicated he will sign it.

The Administration

President Trump

President Trump sent a letter to governors thanking them for their efforts in fighting the COVID-19 emergency, outlining upcoming federal efforts, and expressing hope for the future.

Department of Health and Human Services

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

CMS has issued guidance for CLIA laboratories regarding the review of pathology slides, proficiency testing, alternate collection devices, and requirements for a CLIA certificate during the COVID-19 public health emergency.

CMS has released a notice announcing that it is delaying the release of its minimum data set (MDS – 3.0 v1.18.1) for nursing home and swing bed providers.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Food and Drug Administration