MACPAC Meets

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission met for two days last week in Washington, D.C.

The following is MACPAC’s own summary of the sessions.

MACPAC kicked off its April meeting with a review of a draft chapter for the June 2021 report to Congress and recommendations on addressing high-cost specialty drugs. Since 2017, the Commission has been working to identify potential models that could help states address the challenges of high prices. The presentation focused on drugs that have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under the accelerated approval pathway. Such approvals are based on whether the drug has an effect on a surrogate endpoint that is reasonably likely to predict a clinical benefit; however, unlike under the traditional pathway, the clinical benefit has yet to be verified.

On Friday, the Commission voted to approve two recommendations* that address Medicaid payment for such drugs. The recommendations would increase the rebates under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program on accelerated approval drugs until these drugs have verified the clinical benefit. Once the FDA converts the drugs to traditional approval, the rebates would revert back to the standard amounts.

Commissioners then turned their attention to ways states can integrate care through Medicare Advantage dual eligible special needs plans (D-SNPs) using contract authority under the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008 (MIPPA, P.L. 110-275). The draft chapter for the June report describes why MACPAC is focused on D-SNPs, MIPPA strategies available to states, state ability to use these strategies, and MACPAC’s plans for future work on specific strategies that if made mandatory could give further momentum to state efforts.

The Commission then discussed two additional draft chapters for the June 2021 report related to behavioral health services. Staff presented a draft chapter and recommendations on improving access to mental health services for adult Medicaid beneficiaries, followed by a draft chapter and recommendations on improving access to behavioral health services for children and youth.

Commissioners on Friday approved recommendations* that call on the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to:

  • direct relevant agencies to issue joint subregulatory guidance that addresses how Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) can be used to fund a crisis continuum for beneficiaries experiencing behavioral health crises;
  • direct a coordinated effort to provide education, technical assistance, and planning support to expand access to such services;
  • direct relevant agencies to issue joint subregulatory guidance that addresses the design and implementation of benefits for children and adolescents with significant mental health conditions covered by Medicaid and CHIP; and
  • direct a coordinated effort to provide education, technical assistance, and planning support to expand access to such services.

After a break on Thursday, Commissioners discussed a draft chapter for the June 2021 report to Congress on how electronic health records (EHRs) can be used to strengthen clinical integration and improve patient care.  Adoption of EHRs remains low among behavioral health providers. The chapter provides an overview of MACPAC’s work to date on clinical integration for behavioral and  physical health services, and discusses how data-sharing can improve the quality of care for beneficiaries with behavioral health conditions. It concludes by identifying ways to strengthen EHR uptake among Medicaid’s behavioral health providers.

Next, Commissioners reviewed a draft chapter on non-emergency medical transportation (NEMT). In recent years, policymakers at the state and federal levels have begun to re-examine this benefit. As part of a congressionally mandated request, MACPAC conducted a multi-pronged study of NEMT that will be published as a chapter in the June 2021 report to Congress. This presentation included the key findings of MACPAC’s study and an overview of the topics covered in the draft chapter.

On Friday, the day kicked off with a discussion of the challenges that states face in providing more care through home- and community-based services (HCBS). As of fiscal year (FY) 2018, HCBS spending as a percentage of long-term services and supports spending remained under 50 percent in 18 states and the District of Columbia. To understand why some states have made less progress in rebalancing, MACPAC contracted with RTI International and the Center for Healthcare Strategies. This presentation summarized the results of the work, as well as proposed policy considerations.

The Commission then heard a staff presentation on key Medicaid and CHIP managed care quality requirements, as well as quality improvement and measurement activities conducted by states, plans, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Staff also provided a summary of preliminary findings on state performance over time on selected core set measures and managed care plan performance on performance improvement projects, which suggest the effectiveness of these efforts is unclear. Staff and Commissioners identified potential areas for future MACPAC work related to quality of care in Medicaid and CHIP.

After the Commission voted on several recommendations, staff provided an update on the current state of Transformed Medicaid Statistical Information System (T-MSIS) data submissions and MACPAC’s work to validate and analyze the data. MACPAC found that data submissions have improved since 2016, but some challenges remain.

The meeting concluded with a panel discussion about Medicaid’s use of telehealth services, which expanded during the COVID-19 pandemic. Commissioners heard from Chethan Bachireddy, chief medical officer for the Virginia Department of Medical Assistance Services; Tracy Johnson, Medicaid director for the Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing; and Sara Salek, chief medical officer for the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System. Panelists described the use of telehealth during the pandemic, considerations for post-pandemic telehealth policies, and challenges to the use and adoption of telehealth in Medicaid and how these states are addressing them.

*All recommendations were approved as presented in draft.

Supporting the discussion were the following briefing papers:

  1. High-Cost Specialty Drugs Review of Draft Chapter and Recommendations
  2. Strategies for State Contracts with Dual Eligible Special Needs Plans
  3. Access to Mental Health Services for Adults: Draft Chapter and Recommendations
  4. Access to Behavioral Health Services for Children and Adolescents: Draft Chapter and Recommendations
  5. Electronic Health Records as a Tool for Integration of Behavioral Health Services
  6. Mandated Report: Non-Emergency Medical Transportation Benefit
  7. Progress on Rebalancing: Lessons from States
  8. Ensuring Medicaid and CHIP Quality
  9. Update on Transformed Medicaid Statistical Information System (T-MSIS)
  10. Panel Discussion: What States are Learning from Expanded Use of Telehealth

Because they serve so many Medicaid and CHIP patients – more than the typical hospital – MACPAC’s deliberations are especially important to private safety-net hospitals.

MACPAC is a non-partisan legislative branch agency that provides policy and data analysis and makes recommendations to Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department  of Health and Human Services, and the states on a wide variety of issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.  Find its web site here.

Health Policy Update for Monday, April 12

The following is the latest health policy news from the federal government as of 2:30 p.m. on Monday, April 12.

The White House

COVID-19

Health Policy and Budget News

  • The Biden administration has released its proposed FY 2022 discretionary budget, which addresses, among other things, many aspects of health care policy.  Find the news release announcing the proposed budget here and the budget document itself here.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

COVID-19

Proposed Rules

  • CMS has published a special edition of its online publication MLN Connects devoted entirely to its recently published regulations proposing FY 2022 Medicare payments for skilled nursing facilities, hospice providers, inpatient rehabilitation facilities, and inpatient psychiatric facilities.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

COVID-19

National Institutes of Health

COVID-19

  • The NIH has issued new guidance on the use of monoclonal antibodies to treat patients with COVID-19.  This varies from past guidance because of differences in the effectiveness of some monoclonal antibodies, used on their own or in combination with others, on COVID-19 and COVID-19 variants.  Go here to see the NIH’s notice, explanation, and rationale for the changing recommendations.

Food and Drug Administration

COVID-19

  • The FDA has issued a letter to health care personnel and facilities recommending transition from use of decontaminated disposable respirators.  The FDA recommends that health care personnel and facilities transition away from crisis capacity conservation strategies, such as decontamination or bioburden reduction, currently used on disposable respirators for reuse.  Based on the increased domestic supply of new respirators approved by the CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) currently available to facilitate this transition, the FDA and CDC believe there is adequate supply of respirators to transition away from use of decontamination and bioburden reduction systems.

Federal Emergency Management Agency

COVID-19

  • FEMA has published audit-related guidance to assist recipients and sub-recipients of COVID-19-related public assistance to document and account for disaster costs, minimize the loss of FEMA funding, maximize financial recovery, provide information about procurement and contracting requirements during emergency and exigent circumstances, and prevent fraud, waste, and abuse of disaster funds.  Find the FEMA fact sheet here.  Find information about emergency medical care activities eligible for FEMA support here.

Department of Labor

Health Policy News

The Department of Labor has posted resources to inform stakeholders about new COBRA premium assistance authorized by the American Rescue Plan.  Find those resources here.

Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission

Health Policy News

MACPAC has published an annotated bibliography of racial and ethnic disparities in Medicaid.

 

MACPAC Issues Recommendations to Congress

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission has submitted its annual report to Congress on Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

The report includes recommendations for:

  • improving Medicaid’s responsiveness during economic downturns
  • addressing concerns about high rates of maternal morbidity and mortality;
  • reexamining Medicaid’s estate recovery policies
  • integrating care for people who are dually eligible for Medicaid and Medicare
  • improving hospital payment policy for the nation’s safety-net hospitals

MACPAC is a non-partisan legislative branch agency that “provides policy and data analysis and makes recommendations to Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the states on a wide array of issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).”  Its mandate calls for it to address matters such as Medicaid and CHIP payment, eligibility, enrollment and retention, coverage, access to care, quality of care, and the programs’ interaction with Medicare and the health care system generally.

Because safety-net hospitals care for so many more Medicaid and CHIP participants than the typical community hospital, MACPAC’s deliberations are especially important to them.

Learn more about MACPAC’s recommendations in its Report to Congress on Medicaid and CHIP.

MACPAC Looks at Recipients of Provider Relief Fund Grants

What kinds of providers did and did not receive grants from the CARES Act’s Provider Relief Fund?  What were the obstacles to receiving those COVID-19 relief grants and why did some providers fare better in the distribution of Provider Relief Fund resources than others?

These questions and more are addressed in “COVID Relief Funding for Medicaid Providers,” a new analysis released by the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission.

MACPAC Meets

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission met for two days last week in Washington, D.C.

The following is MACPAC’s own summary of the sessions.

MACPAC kicked off its January meeting with a review of a draft chapter for the March 2021 report to Congress and recommendations on a mandatory extension of Medicaid coverage for 12 months postpartum. The Commission received extensive public comment on the recommendations. On Friday, the Commission approved three recommendations as drafted related to postpartum coverage. The Commission recommended that Congress should:

  • extend the postpartum coverage period for individuals who were eligible and enrolled in Medicaid while pregnant to a full year of coverage, regardless of changes in income. Services provided to individuals during the extended postpartum coverage period will receive an enhanced 100 percent federal matching rate;
  • extend the postpartum coverage period for individuals who were eligible and enrolled in the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) while pregnant (if the state provides such coverage) to a full year of coverage, regardless of changes in income; and
  • require states to provide full Medicaid benefits to individuals enrolled in all pregnancy-related pathways.

Commissioners then turned their attention to Medicaid estate recovery policies that affect beneficiaries using long-term services and supports (LTSS). Commissioners on Friday approved recommendations to:

  • make estate recovery optional rather than required;
  • allow states with managed long-term services and supports to pursue recovery based on the cost of services where it is less than the capitation payment paid to a managed care plan; and
  • direct the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to establish minimum hardship waiver standards, including a minimum estate value threshold for estate recovery.

Next, the Commission considered recommendations for countercyclical financing adjustments in Medicaid. This would allow federal financial stimulus to be directed to states more quickly during economic downturns and provide states with greater budget predictability. The Commission approved a recommendation that Congress should adopt a statutory mechanism to amend the Social Security Act to provide an automatic Medicaid countercyclical financing model, using the prototype developed by the U.S. Government Accountability Office as the basis. The Commission also recommended this policy change should include:

  • an eligibility maintenance of effort requirement for the period covered by an automatic countercyclical financing adjustment;
  • an upper bound of 100 percent on countercyclical adjusted matching rates; and
  • exclusion of countercyclical adjusted federal matching rate from services and populations that receive special matching rates (e.g., for the new adult group) or are otherwise capped or have allotments (e.g., disproportionate share hospital payments, territories).

After a break on Thursday, Commissioners discussed a draft chapter for the March 2021 report on design considerations for creating a new program for dually eligible beneficiaries and reviewed a report to Congress by the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) on Medicaid housing supports for individuals with substance use disorder (SUD). The Commission plans to send a letter to HHS and leadership of relevant congressional committees commenting on the Secretary’s report to Congress on Medicaid housing supports for people with SUD who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness.

Next, Commissioners heard a panel discussion on the outlook for state budgets and the implications for Medicaid with Emily Blanford, program principal at the National Conference of State Legislatures; Shelby Kerns, executive director for the National Association of State Budget Officers; and Susie Perez Quinn, government affairs director for the National Governors Association. * The day ended with a presentation on value-based payment for maternity services.

On Friday, Commissioners heard a panel discussion on how Medicaid serves people with intellectual or developmental disabilities with Sharon Lewis, a principal at Health Management Associates; Melissa Stone, director of Arkansas’ Division of Developmental Disabilities Services; and Elizabeth Weintraub, a senior advocacy specialist at the Association of University Centers on Disabilities. * Additional sessions focused on a congressionally mandated MACPAC study of non-emergency medical transportation (NEMT), which will be included in the June 2021 report to Congress. In addition, Commissioners heard a new analyses of care integration for dually eligible beneficiaries, and a discussion of potential new models for payment and coverage of high-cost specialty drugs. The meeting concluded with a discussion of mental health parity in Medicaid.

Supporting the discussion were the following briefing papers:

  1. Postpartum Coverage: Review of Draft Chapter and Recommendation Decisions
  2. Medicaid Estate Recovery Draft Chapter and Recommendations
  3. Automatic Countercyclical Financing Adjustment Review of Draft Chapter and Recommendation Decision
  4. Establishing a Unified Program for Dually Eligible Beneficiaries Design Considerations
  5. Review of the Secretary’s Report on Medicaid Housing Supports for Individuals with Substance Use Disorder
  6. Value-Based Payment for Maternity Care in Medicaid
  7. Mandated Report on Non-Emergency Medical Transportation Further Findings
  8. Integration of Care for Dually Eligible Beneficiaries: New Analyses
  9. Payment and Coverage of High-Cost Specialty Drugs Report from Technical Advisory Panel
  10. Implementation of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act in Medicaid and CHIP

Because they serve so many Medicaid and CHIP patients – more than the typical hospital – MACPAC’s deliberations are especially important to private safety-net hospitals.

MACPAC is a non-partisan legislative branch agency that provides policy and data analysis and makes recommendations to Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department  of Health and Human Services, and the states on a wide variety of issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.  Find its web site here.

 

MACPAC Meets

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission met for two days last week in Washington, D.C.

The following is MACPAC’s own summary of the sessions.

The October 2020 MACPAC meeting opened with a panel discussion on restarting Medicaid eligibility redeterminations when the public health emergency ends.  It included Jennifer Wagner, director of Medicaid eligibility and enrollment at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities; René Mollow, deputy director for health care benefits and eligibility at the California Department of Health Care Services; and Lee Guice, director of policy and operations at the Department for Medicaid Services, Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services.

After a break, Commissioners heard a panel discussion with Kevin Prindiville, executive director at Justice in Aging; Mark Miller, executive vice president of healthcare at Arnold Ventures; and Charlene Frizzera, senior advisor at Leavitt Partners, on creating a new program for dually eligible beneficiaries. Later, staff presented preliminary findings from a mandated report on non-emergency medical transportation. The day concluded with a report on nursing facility acuity adjustment methods.

On Friday, the day began with a session on access to mental health services for adults in Medicaid. It was followed by a related panel discussion on mental health services with Sandra Wilkniss, director of complex care policy and senior fellow at Families USA; Melisa Byrd, senior deputy director for the District of Columbia Department of Health Care Finance; and Dorn Schuffman, director of the CCBHC Demonstration Project at the Missouri Department of Mental Health.

Next, the Commission considered the merits of extending Medicaid coverage for pregnant women beyond 60 days postpartum. Staff then provided an update on a statutorily required analysis of disproportionate share hospital (DSH) allotments, as well as an analysis of addressing high-cost drugs and the challenges they present to Medicaid.

The meeting concluded with comment on the Secretary’s report to Congress on Reducing Barriers to Furnishing Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Services Using Telehealth and Remote Patient Monitoring for Pediatric Populations under Medicaid. The Commission decided to send a letter to Congress and the Secretary commenting on this report.

Supporting the discussion were the following briefing papers:

  1. Mandated Report on Non-Emergency Medical Transportation: Work Plan and Preliminary Findings
  2. Changes in Nursing Facility Acuity Adjustment Methods
  3. Access to Mental Health Services for Adults in Medicaid
  4. Considerations in Extending Postpartum Coverage
  5. Required Annual Analysis of Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) Allotments
  6. Addressing High-Cost Drugs and Pipeline Analysis
  7. Comment on Secretary’s Report to Congress on Reducing Barriers to Substance Use Disorder Services Using Telehealth for Pediatric Populations under Medicaid

Because they serve so many Medicaid and CHIP patients – more than the typical hospital – MACPAC’s deliberations are especially important to private safety-net hospitals.

MACPAC is a non-partisan legislative branch agency that provides policy and data analysis and makes recommendations to Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department  of Health and Human Services, and the states on a wide variety of issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.  Find its web site here.

MACPAC Meets

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission met for two days last week in Washington, D.C.

The following is MACPAC’s own summary of the sessions.

The February 2020 MACPAC meeting opened with a continuation of MACPAC’s examination of Medicaid’s role in maternal health, when Medicaid officials from Michigan, New Jersey, and North Carolina joined the Commission to discuss how their states are addressing maternal morbidity and mortality.* The Commission plans to include a chapter on maternal health in its June 2020 report to Congress. Commissioners later turned their attention to policy options for improving enrollment in the Medicare Savings Program.

The Commission later took a deep dive into value-based payment in Medicaid managed care. This three-part session began with findings from a series of interviews with state officials, managed care organizations, and other stakeholders aimed at understanding how states use managed care to promote payment reform, conducted by MACPAC contractor Bailit Health. Then, representatives from three of these organizations shared their reactions to the findings and talked about how value-based payment models are working in practice.* The session concluded with Commissioners’ perspectives on the study’s findings and the panelists’ reactions to them, and possible next steps.

The final session of the afternoon continued a line of inquiry begun at the October 2019 meeting: third-party liability coordination between Medicaid and TRICARE. MACPAC estimates that almost 1 million Medicaid enrollees have primary coverage through TRICARE, which provides health benefits for military personnel, military retirees, and their dependents. Commissioners explored making recommendations in the June report to improve coordination between the two programs.

On Friday, the Commission returned to the theme of improving care for dually eligible beneficiaries, looking more closely at the rise of so-called dual-eligible special needs plan (D-SNP) look-alikes and how changes in the Medicare Advantage market are affecting efforts to integrate care. Commissioners also reviewed a rule proposed in February that would, among other things, restrict the growth of look-alikes.

Following that session, the Commission discussed draft recommendations to improve integration of Medicare and Medicaid benefits for dually eligible beneficiaries. The February meeting wrapped up with a discussion of a forthcoming rule expected to affect the Medicaid eligibility determination process.

Supporting the discussion were the following briefing papers:

  1. State Medicaid Initiatives to Improve Maternal Health
  2. Improving Participation in the Medicare Savings Programs: Decisions on Draft Recommendations for the June Report to Congress
  3. State Strategies to Promote the Use of Value-Based Payments in Medicaid Managed Care
  4. Medicaid and TRICARE: Third-Party Liability Coordination
  5. How Changes in the Medicare Advantage Market Are Affecting Integration of Care for Dually Eligible Beneficiaries: Analysis and Comments on Proposed Rule
  6. Improving Integrated Care for Dually Eligible Beneficiaries: Decisions on Recommendations to be Included in June Report to Congress
  7. Forthcoming Rule on Program Integrity and Eligibility Determination Processes

Because they serve so many Medicaid and CHIP patients – more than the typical hospital – MACPAC’s deliberations are especially important to private safety-net hospitals.

MACPAC is a non-partisan legislative branch agency that provides policy and data analysis and makes recommendations to Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department  of Health and Human Services, and the states on a wide variety of issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.  Find its web site here.

MACPAC Meets

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission met for two days last week in Washington, D.C.

The following is MACPAC’s own summary of the sessions.

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission kicked off its December meeting with highlights from its forthcoming issue of MACStats: Medicaid and CHIP Data Book, due out December 18, 2019. MACStats brings together statistics on Medicaid and State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) enrollment and spending, federal matching rates, eligibility levels, and access to care measures, which come from multiple sources.

Later the Commission discussed a proposed rule that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services issued in November, which—among other changes—would increase federal oversight of Medicaid supplemental payments. The final morning session addressed payment error rates in Medicaid, with a briefing on the annual Department of Health and Human Services Agency Financial Report (AFR). Fiscal year 2019 was the first time that the AFR incorporated eligibility errors since the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid eligibility and enrollment changes took effect in 2014.

After lunch, MACPAC staff summarized themes from expert roundtables convened in November, one to explore Medicaid policy on high-cost specialty drugs and another on the need for more actionable Section 1115 demonstration evaluations. Then, the Commission turned its attention to Medicaid estate recovery policies. The final session of the day looked at issues associated with reforming the current Medicaid financing structure to better respond to economic downturns.

At Friday’s opening session, the Commission considered policy options to increase participation in Medicare Savings Programs, which provide Medicare cost-sharing assistance to beneficiaries who are dually eligible for Medicaid and Medicare. Afterward, the Commission continued its examination of care integration for dually eligible beneficiaries, this time focusing on policy options to reduce barriers to integrated care. The Commission then switched gears for a briefing on a new MACPAC analysis of Medicaid’s role in financing maternity care. The December meeting concluded with a review of the draft chapter for the Commission’s March report to Congress analyzing disproportionate share hospital (DSH) payments.

Supporting the discussion were the following briefing papers:

  1. MACStats: Medicaid and CHIP Data Book
  2. Review of Proposed Rule on Supplemental Payments and Financing
  3. Review of PERM Findings
  4. Themes from Expert Roundtable on Medicaid Policy on High-Cost Drugs
  5. Improving the Quality and Timeliness of Section 1115 Demonstration Evaluations: Themes from Expert Roundtable
  6. Medicaid Estate Recovery Policies
  7. Policy and Design Issues for a Countercyclical Federal Medicaid Assistance Percentage
  8. Medicare Savings Programs Policy Options
  9. Barriers to Integrated Care for Dually Eligible Beneficiaries
  10. Medicaid’s Role in Financing Maternity Care
  11. Review of Draft Chapter on Statutorily Required Analyses of Disproportionate Share Hospital Payment

Because they serve so many Medicaid and CHIP patients – more than the typical hospital – MACPAC’s deliberations are especially important to private safety-net hospitals.

MACPAC is a non-partisan legislative branch agency that provides policy and data analysis and makes recommendations to Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department  of Health and Human Services, and the states on a wide variety of issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.  Find its web site here.

MACPAC Posts Meeting Transcript

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission met in Washington, D.C. earlier this month.  The issues on MACPAC’s agenda were:

  • state readiness to report mandatory core set measures
  • analysis of buprenorphine prescribing patterns among advanced practitioners in Medicaid
  • Medicaid’s statistical information system (T-MSIS)
  • Medicaid disproportionate share hospital payment (Medicaid DSH) allotments
  • Medicaid policies related to third-party liability
  • Medicaid and maternal health

A transcript of the MACPAC meeting is now available.  Find it here.

MACPAC Looks at Medicaid DSH

At a time when cuts in Medicaid disproportionate share hospital payments (Medicaid DSH) are still scheduled for the current fiscal year and some in Congress are calling for a new approach to allotting DSH funds among the states, the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission has released its annual analysis of Medicaid DSH allotments to the states.

The report includes:

  • data about changes in the uninsured rate
  • demographic information about the uninsured
  • information about the cost of hospital uncompensated care
  • perspectives on hospital Medicaid shortfalls
  • a comparison of hospital uncompensated care costs when calculated using different methodologies
  • data about hospitals that provide “essential community services”
  • information about scheduled Medicaid DSH allotment reductions

All private safety-net hospitals receive Medicaid DSH payments and consider the program an essential tool for serving their communities.

MACPAC will issue a more complete report to Congress in March of 2020.

Learn more about how MACPAC views Medicaid DSH at a time when the program is scheduled to change – and when some want even more change – in the new MACPAC document “Required Analyses of Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) Allotments.”