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NASH Registers Concerns Over Uncompensated Care Audits

The process the federal government is employing to audit the uncompensated care costs that hospitals report to Medicare is plagued with problems, the National Alliance of Safety-Net Hospitals has written in a letter to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.

Those problems could result in reduced Medicare disproportionate share hospital payments (Medicare DSH) to private safety-net hospitals in the future, NASH warned in the letter.

According to NASH, problems with the audits of hospitals’ Medicare cost report S-10 worksheets, where they report their uncompensated care, include inconsistencies in the methods auditors are using and the data they demand and unreasonable deadlines for submitting requested supplemental data.

To address these problems, NASH asked CMS to standardize the auditing process and to convey decisions about auditing standards, methodologies, and time frames to hospitals.

In light of these problems, NASH also asked CMS not to use audited data to calculate Medicare DSH uncompensated care payments for FY 2020.

The S-10 audits are so important to private safety-net hospitals because the uncompensated care reported on the S-10 is used in the calculation of participating hospitals’ Medicare DSH uncompensated care payments.  When auditors reduce eligible hospitals’ uncompensated care data, that will result in future reductions of the Medicare DSH payments hospitals receive.  Those Medicare DSH payments play a vital role in helping to underwrite the cost of the care private safety-net hospitals provide to uninsured patients, so any undeserved reduction in those payments could hurt those hospitals and result in reduced access to care in the communities they serve.

Learn more by reading NASH’s letter to CMS about current challenges with uncompensated care audits.

End Run Around Congress for Medicaid Block Grants?

The Trump administration reportedly is considering introducing Medicaid block grants through regulations rather than legislation, according to published reports.

Those reports explain that the administration may seek to offer states an opportunity to apply to the federal government to use Medicaid block grants by obtaining section 1115 Medicaid waivers, a commonly used tool for states seeking exemptions from federal legislative or regulatory requirements.

As reported by the online publication The Hill,

…the Trump administration is now considering issuing guidance to states encouraging them to apply for caps on federal Medicaid spending in exchange for additional flexibility on how they run the program, according to people familiar with the discussions.

Proposals to implement Medicaid block grants have arisen periodically over the past decade but have never gotten beyond the discussion stage because of how difficult it would probably be to gain congressional approval for such a program.  This latest proposal would seek to circumvent that problem by making Medicaid block grants optional for states and permitting those states interested in using them to apply for a Medicaid waiver from Centers for Medicaid & Medicaid Services to do so.

It is not clear whether such an approach would be legal.

NASH has long been skeptical about Medicaid block grants, concerned that the manner in which such block grants are implemented could impose artificial limits on state Medicaid spending that could be especially harmful during economic downturns when Medicaid enrollment typically rises and the demand for Medicaid-covered services falls especially heavily on private safety-net hospitals.  NASH’s advocacy agenda for 2019 addresses this very issue, explaining that

Block grants, whether based on individual states’ Medicaid enrollment or on their past Medicaid spending, could impose unreasonable limits on Medicaid spending that could potentially leave private safety-net hospitals unreimbursed for care they provide to legitimately eligible individuals. NASH will work to ensure that any new approach that involves Medicaid block grants continues to give states the ability to pay safety-net hospitals adequately for the essential services they provide to the low-income residents of the communities in which those hospitals are located.

Learn more about this latest proposal in The Hill article “Trump officials consider allowing Medicaid block grants for states.”

NASH Unveils 2019 Agenda

The National Alliance of Safety-Net Hospitals has unveiled its public policy advocacy agenda for 2019.

That agenda explains that NASH will:

  • Address Medicare issues such as continuing threats to private safety-net hospitals’ Medicare DSH payments, audits of the Medicare cost report’s S-10 form, graduate medical education payments, potential cuts in bad debt, 340B, the participation of private safety-net hospitals in value-based purchasing and alternative payment model programs, and the expected national conversation about “Medicare for all.”
  • Address Medicaid issues such as the adequacy of Medicaid DSH payments, possible reductions in Medicaid eligibility and benefits, the implications of a new proposal to define whether new immigrants and their families pose a threat of becoming “public charges,” the possible introduction of Medicaid block grants, and possible new restrictions on how states may finance their Medicaid programs.
  • Work to protect private safety-net hospitals from federal spending cuts.
  • Reintroduce itself to Congress and the administration.
  • Seek to enhance its ability to help shape government health care policy in Washington by recruiting more members.

For NASH’s complete 2019 advocacy agenda click here

“Public Charge” Proposal Raises Potential Issues for Safety-Net Hospitals

A proposal by the Department of Homeland Security could make it more difficult for some immigrants to stay in the U.S. permanently by scrutinizing more closely whether they might become a “public charge” if they remain in the country and rejecting those who appear likely to do so.

By “public charge” the draft Homeland Security regulation refers to people who might depend or come to depend heavily on government assistance if they remain in the country.

If implemented, such a regulation might discourage immigrants from enrolling in government health care programs, which could endanger their health and make it more difficult for urban safety-net hospitals to serve their communities, many of which have large numbers of immigrants.  The regulation also might encourage some people to drop out of government programs that provide services they need.

NASH is concerned about the potential impact of this regulation on private safety-net hospitals and intends to submit formal comments about the proposal.  Comments are due by mid-December.

To learn more about the proposed regulation, see this Washington Post article or go here to see proposed regulation itself.