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MedPAC Meets

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. last week to discuss various Medicare payment issues.

Among the issues discussed at MedPAC’s April meeting were:

  • Medicare skilled nursing facility value-based purchased program.
  • Medicare alternative payment models (APMs).
  • Medicare Advantage benchmark policy.
  • Medicare indirect medical education (Medicare IME) payments.
  • Medicare vaccine coverage and payments.
  • Medicare payment for prescription drugs prescribed on an outpatient basis.
  • Private equity and Medicare.
  • Medicare clinical laboratory fee schedule.

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving Medicare.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.  Because so many patients of private safety-net hospitals are insured by Medicare, MedPAC’s deliberations are especially important to those hospitals.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues.

MedPAC: Go Slow on Expanding Medicare Telehealth

MedPAC wants Medicare to test the impact of telehealth on health care under non-COVID-19 conditions before moving forward with expanding the tool’s use in the Medicare population.

In a news release accompanying its recently released annual report to Congress on Medicare payment policy, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission writes that

In the report, we present a policy option for expanded coverage for Medicare telehealth policy after the PHE is over. Under the policy option, policymakers should temporarily continue some of the telehealth expansions for a limited duration of time (e.g., one to two years after the PHE) to gather more evidence about the impact of telehealth on beneficiary access to care, quality of care, and program spending to inform any permanent changes. During this limited period, Medicare should temporarily pay for specified telehealth services provided to all beneficiaries regardless of their location, and it should continue to cover certain newly-covered telehealth services and certain audio-only telehealth services if there is potential for clinical benefit.

The policy option also specifies that after the PHE ends, Medicare should return to paying the physician fee schedule’s facility rate for telehealth services and collect data on the cost of providing those services. In addition, providers should not be allowed to reduce or waive beneficiary cost sharing for telehealth services after the PHE. CMS should also implement other safeguards to protect the Medicare program and its beneficiaries from unnecessary spending and potential fraud related to telehealth.

While MedPAC’s recommendations to Congress are not binding on the administration, its work is highly respected and it is considered influential in the development of Medicare reimbursement policy.

Learn more about what MedPAC has to say about telehealth services and other aspects of Medicare payment policy in this MedPAC news release and the MedPAC’s newly released Report to the Congress:  Medicare Payment Policy.

 

MedPAC Meets

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. last week to discuss various Medicare payment issues.

Among the issues discussed at MedPAC’s March meeting were:

  • Medicare beneficiary access to care in rural areas
  • skilled nursing facility value-based purchasing program and proposed replacement
  • streamlining CMS’s portfolio of alternative payment models
  • balancing efficiency with equity in Medicare Advantage benchmark policy
  • relationship between clinician services and other Medicare services
  • revising Medicare’s indirect medical education payments to better reflect teaching hospitals’ costs
  • Medicare’s vaccine coverage and payment
  • separately payable drugs in the hospital outpatient prospective payment system

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving Medicare.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.  Because so many patients of private safety-net hospitals are insured by Medicare, MedPAC’s deliberations are especially important to those hospitals.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues.

MedPAC Meets

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. recently to discuss various Medicare payment issues.

Among the issues discussed at MedPAC’s January meeting were:

  • hospital inpatient and outpatient payments
  • physician and health professionals payments
  • the possible expansion of the post-acute transfer policy to hospice
  • ambulatory surgical center, outpatient dialysis, and hospice payments
  • Medicare payments for skilled nursing facilities, long-term hospitals, inpatient rehabilitation facilities, and home health services
  • the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation’s development and implementation of alternative payment models
  • the future of telehealth after the COVID-19 public health emergency ends
  • a status report on the Medicare Part D prescription drug program
  • a report on the skilled nursing facility value-based purchasing program and a proposed replacement for that program
  • Medicare’s vaccine coverage and payment policies

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving Medicare.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.  Because so many patients of private safety-net hospitals are insured by Medicare, MedPAC’s deliberations are especially important to those hospitals.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues and go here for a transcript of the two days of meetings.

MedPAC Meets

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. to discuss a number of Medicare payment issues.

MedPAC’s proposed Medicare 2021 payment recommendations dominated the December agenda, including:

  • hospital inpatient and outpatient payments
  • ambulatory surgical center payments
  • physician and health professional payments
  • hospice payments
  • home health care payments
  • inpatient rehabilitation facility payments
  • long-term care hospital payments

In addition, MedPAC discussed Medicare’s policy for transfers between post-acute-care facilities and hospice and received a staff update on the Medicare Advantage program.

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving Medicare.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.  Because so many patients of private safety-net hospitals are insured by Medicare, MedPAC’s deliberations are especially important to those hospitals.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues and for a transcript of the two days of meetings.

MedPAC Meets

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. to discuss a number of Medicare payment issues.

Among the issues on MedPAC’s October agenda were:

  • Medicare Advantage benchmark policy
  • indirect medical education:  current Medicare policy, concerns, and principles for revising
  • the evolution of Medicare’s advanced alternative payment models
  • vertical integration and Medicare payment policy

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.  Because so many patients of private safety-net hospitals are insured by Medicare, MedPAC’s deliberations are especially important to those hospitals.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues and here for a transcript of the proceedings.

MedPAC Talks Telehealth

Expanded telehealth is here to stay, members of the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission agreed at their September public meeting.

What they do not yet know is in what form.

Among the issues that need to be addressed in any post-COVID-19 expansion of Medicare-covered telehealth services are:

  • Whether affording access to telehealth services would exacerbate the digital divide and leave some Medicare beneficiaries with less access to care than others.
  • Whether audio-only coverage, temporarily permitted during the pandemic, should be continued.
  • Whether greater use of telehealth might foster greater use of low-value services.
  • Whether use of non-HIPAA-compliant video technology should continue to be permitted.

Learn more about MedPAC’s deliberations on telehealth in the Healthcare Dive article “MedPAC commissioners hint at telehealth policies that may stick post-COVID-19” and see the presentation that formed the basis for the discussion of this issue at MedPAC’s recent public meeting.

 

MedPAC Meets

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. to discuss a number of Medicare payment issues.

The issues on MedPAC’s September agenda were:

  • the coronavirus pandemic and Medicare
  • context for Medicare payment policy
  • report on the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014’s changes to the Medicare clinical laboratory fee schedule
  • expansion of telehealth in Medicare
  • Medicare coverage for vaccines

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.  Because so many patients of private safety-net hospitals are insured by Medicare, MedPAC’s deliberations are especially important to those hospitals.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues.

MedPAC Reports to Congress

MedPAC has submitted its annual report to Congress.

The congressionally mandated report, titled Report to Congress:  Medicare and the Health Care Delivery System, consists of seven chapters:

  • Realizing the promise of value-based payment in Medicare: an agenda for change.
  • Challenges in maintaining and increasing savings from accountable care organizations (ACOs).
  • Replacing the Medicare Advantage quality bonus program.
  • Mandated report: Impact of changes in the 21st Century Cures Act to risk adjustment for Medicare Advantage enrollees.
  • Realigning incentives in Medicare Part D.
  • Separately payable drugs in the hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS).
  • Improving Medicare’s end-state renal disease (ESRD) prospective payment system (PPS).

While MedPAC’s recommendations are not binding on Congress or the administration, they are highly respected and often find themselves worked into new law or regulations.

Go here to see MedPAC’s news release accompanying the report and here to find the report itself.

MedPAC Offers 2021 Medicare Rate Recommendations

MedPAC has recommended to Congress changes in Medicare payment rates in the coming year.

In its annual report to Congress, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission recommended the following rate changes:

  • acute-care hospitals – a two percent rate increase and a suggestion that the difference between this two percent increase and the payment increase specified by law be used to increase the rewards hospitals may earn under Medicare’s hospital value incentive program.  As a result, the value incentive program would offer a possible 0.8 percent in bonus payments, and with the recommended elimination of the 0.5 percent penalty for which hospitals are at risk, hospitals could average net increases of 3.3 percent.
  • ambulatory surgical centers – no rate increase and a requirement that such facilities report cost data
  • physicians – rates updated as already provided for by law
  • long-term acute-care hospitals – a two percent increase
  • inpatient rehabilitation facilities – a five percent rate reduction
  • skilled nursing facilities – no rate increase
  • dialysis facilities – rates updated as already provided for by law
  • hospice services – no rate increase and the aggregate hospice cap should be wage-adjusted and reduced 20 percent
  • home health agencies – a seven percent rate reduction

While MedPAC’s recommendations to Congress are not binding on the administration, its work is highly respected and is considered influential in the setting of Medicare rates.

Learn more about MedPAC’s recommendations on rates and other aspects of federal Medicare reimbursement policy in the MedPAC document Report to the Congress:  Medicare Payment Policy.