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MedPAC Meets

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. to discuss a number of Medicare payment issues.

The issues on MedPAC’s January agenda were:

  • The Medicare prescription drug program (Part D):  status report and options for restructuring
  • Redesigning the Medicare Advantage quality program:  initial modeling of a value incentive program
  • Hospital inpatient and outpatient payments
  • Physician payments
  • Outpatient dialysis payments
  • Skilled nursing facility, home health, inpatient rehabilitation facility, and long-term-care hospital payments
  • Hospice and ambulatory surgery center payments
  • The 340B program
  • ACO beneficiary assignment

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues.

MedPAC Meeting Transcript Now Available

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C.  Among the Medicare payment issues on its agenda of interest to private safety-net hospitals were:

  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Physician and other health professional services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Ambulatory surgical center services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Hospital inpatient and outpatient services;
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Skilled nursing facility services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Home health care services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Inpatient rehabilitation facility services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Long-term care hospital services

A transcript of that MedPAC meeting is now available.  Find it here.

MedPAC to Meet Tomorrow

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission meets this Thursday and Friday in Washington, D.C.

MedPAC’s December agenda is dominated by Medicare payment issues:  how much Medicare should pay for different types of services in calendar year 2021 and FY 2021.  The services to be addressed during the December 5-6 meetings are physician and other health professional services, ambulatory surgical center services, hospital inpatient and outpatient services, skilling nursing facility services, home health services, inpatient rehabilitation facility services, long-term care hospital services, outpatient dialysis services, and hospice services.

In addition, MedPAC commissioners will discuss their mandated report on expanding Medicare’s post-acute care transfer policy to hospice and hear a status report on the Medicare Advantage program.

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.  Those recommendations, in turn, can have a major impact on the nation’s private safety-net hospitals.

Learn more here.

MedPAC Meets

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. to discuss a number of Medicare payment issues.

The issues on MedPAC’s December agenda were:

  • Medicare payments for physician and other health professionals services
  • payments for ambulatory surgical centers
  • payments for hospital inpatient and outpatient care
  • Medicare’s hospital quality incentive program
  • payments for skilled nursing facilities
  • payments for long-term care hospitals
  • payments for inpatient rehabilitation facilities
  • the Medicare Advantage program

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues.

MedPAC Issues 2018 Report to Congress

The non-partisan legislative branch agency that advises Congress and the administration on Medicare payment policies has submitted its mandatory annual report to Congress.

Among the findings included in the report by the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission are:

  • Medicare’s hospital readmissions reduction program has not resulted in increases in emergency room visits or hospital observation stays.
  • Many Medicare accountable care organizations, while maintaining or improving quality, are producing more modest savings than predicted.
  • MedPAC approves of Medicare’s proposals to redesign the case-mix classification system for skilled nursing facilities.
  • MedPAC supports changes Medicare has proposed for patient assessment and therapy requirements for skilled nursing facilities.

MedPAC’s recommendations include:

  • Authorizing outpatient-only hospitals in isolated rural communities to ensure access to emergency care.
  • Reducing payments to off-campus emergency departments in certain urban areas.
  • Rebalancing Medicare’s physician fee schedule to increase payments for ambulatory evaluation and management services while reducing payments for procedures, imaging, and tests.
  • Paying for sequential stays in a unified prospective payment system for post-acute care.
  • Establishing new ways to help patients, families, and hospitals identify higher-quality post-acute care providers for their patients.
  • Establishing new principles for measuring quality that address both population-based measures and quality incentives.
  • Encouraging the development of managed care plans that better meet the needs of the dually eligible (Medicare and Medicaid) population.
  • Eliminating Medicare payment increases for skilled nursing facilities in FY 2019 and FY 2020 because of the healthy financial condition of those facilities.
  • Urging Medicare to use a uniform set of population-based measures for different health care settings and different populations.
  • Moving forward with a unified post-acute-care payment system as quickly as possible.

Learn more about MedPAC’s thinking, research, conclusions, and recommendations by consulting the following materials:   the news release that accompanied MedPAC’s transmission of its report to Congress; a fact sheet that accompanied the report’s release; and the 407-page report itself.