MedPAC Meets

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. to discuss a number of Medicare payment issues.

The issues on MedPAC’s January agenda were:

  • The Medicare prescription drug program (Part D):  status report and options for restructuring
  • Redesigning the Medicare Advantage quality program:  initial modeling of a value incentive program
  • Hospital inpatient and outpatient payments
  • Physician payments
  • Outpatient dialysis payments
  • Skilled nursing facility, home health, inpatient rehabilitation facility, and long-term-care hospital payments
  • Hospice and ambulatory surgery center payments
  • The 340B program
  • ACO beneficiary assignment

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues.

MedPAC Meeting Transcript Now Available

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C.  Among the Medicare payment issues on its agenda of interest to private safety-net hospitals were:

  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Physician and other health professional services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Ambulatory surgical center services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Hospital inpatient and outpatient services;
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Skilled nursing facility services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Home health care services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Inpatient rehabilitation facility services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Long-term care hospital services

A transcript of that MedPAC meeting is now available.  Find it here.

MedPAC Meets

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. to discuss a number of Medicare payment issues.

Among the issues on MedPAC’s December agenda that were of special interest to private safety-net hospitals were:

  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Physician and other health professional services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Ambulatory surgical center services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Hospital inpatient and outpatient services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Home health care services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Inpatient rehabilitation facility services
  • Assessing payment adequacy and updating payments: Long-term care hospital services

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy – policies that often have a major impact on private safety-net hospitals.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues.

MedPAC to Meet Tomorrow

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission meets this Thursday and Friday in Washington, D.C.

MedPAC’s December agenda is dominated by Medicare payment issues:  how much Medicare should pay for different types of services in calendar year 2021 and FY 2021.  The services to be addressed during the December 5-6 meetings are physician and other health professional services, ambulatory surgical center services, hospital inpatient and outpatient services, skilling nursing facility services, home health services, inpatient rehabilitation facility services, long-term care hospital services, outpatient dialysis services, and hospice services.

In addition, MedPAC commissioners will discuss their mandated report on expanding Medicare’s post-acute care transfer policy to hospice and hear a status report on the Medicare Advantage program.

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.  Those recommendations, in turn, can have a major impact on the nation’s private safety-net hospitals.

Learn more here.

MedPAC Meets

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. to discuss a number of Medicare payment issues.

The issues on MedPAC’s November agenda were:

  • congressional request on health care provider consolidation
  • increasing the supply of primary care physicians
  • redesigning the Medicare Advantage quality bonus program
  • reforming the benchmarks in the Medicare Advantage payment system
  • considerations for plans serving low-income beneficiaries in the restructuring of Medicare Part D
  • post-acute care spending under the Medicare Shared Savings Program

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.  Those recommendations, in turn, can have a major impact on the nation’s private safety-net hospitals.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues.

No Primary Doc Shortage for Medicare Patients – at Least Not Yet

Medicare patients currently have adequate access to primary care physicians, according to the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission.

But that could change in the near future, MedPAC warns.

Amid long-term concerns about whether there are enough primary care doctors, a new MedPAC report found that there are even fewer primary care doctors than most people believe.  MedPAC reached this conclusion after finding that approximately one out of every five doctors thought to be working as primary care physicians now labor instead as hospitalists.  As a result, growth in the number of primary care physicians has been negligible during the current decade.

Counteracting this shift are two trends:  first, Medicare patients appear to be seeing their primary care doctors less than in the past:  3.7 visits a year in 2017 versus 4.1 in 2013; and other practitioners, such as physician assistants and nurse practitioners, are seeing patients more frequently – 1.8 such encounters a year in 2017, up significantly from 1.1 in 2013.

Despite this, MedPAC is concerned that if the current trend of minimal growth in the supply of primary care physicians continues, Medicare beneficiaries may lack appropriate access to primary care in the future.

This issue is especially important to private safety-net hospitals because many serve especially large numbers of low-income Medicare patients who often face challenges in gaining access to the care they need.

Learn more from the Healthcare Dive article “As docs ditch primary care to become hospitalists, MedPAC warns of shortage” or see the new MedPAC report “Updates to the methods used to assess the adequacy of Medicare payments for physician and other health professional service.”

MedPAC Meets

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. to discuss a number of Medicare payment issues.

Among issues on MedPAC’s October agenda of potential interest to private safety-net hospitals were:

  • restructuring Medicare Part D
  • updates to the methods used to assess the adequacy of Medicare’s payments for physicians and other health professionals
  • population-based outcome measures: avoidable hospitalizations and emergency department visits
  • aligning benefits and cost-sharing under a unified payment system for post-acute care

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program. While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues.

MedPAC Meets

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. to discuss a number of Medicare payment issues.

Among issues on MedPAC’s September agenda were:

  • context for Medicare payment policy
  • the effects of Medicare Advantage “spillover” on Medicare fee-for-service spending and coding
  • evaluation of the hospital readmissions reduction program
  • Medicare indirect medical education (IME) policy, concerns, and considerations for revising

These issues are important to most private safety-net hospitals.

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues.

MedPAC Weighs in on Proposed Medicare Payment Changes

The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission has submitted formal comments to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in response to the latter’s publication of a proposed regulation that would govern how Medicare will pay for acute-care hospital inpatient services and long-term hospital care in the coming 2020 fiscal year.

The 14-page MedPAC report addresses four aspects of the proposed Medicare payment regulation:

  • inpatient- and outpatient drug- and device related payment proposals
  • proposed changes in the hospital area wage index
  • the reporting of hospitals’ uncompensated care on the Medicare cost report’s S-10 worksheet
  • the long-term hospital prospective payment system

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.

See MedPAC’s letter to CMS here.

See NASH’s reponse to the same CMS proposed regulation here.

MedPAC Meets

Last week the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission met in Washington, D.C. to discuss a number of Medicare payment issues.

The issues on MedPAC’s April agenda were:

  • Expanding the use of value-based payment in Medicare
  • Medicare Shared Savings Program performance
  • Redesigning the Medicare Advantage quality bonus program
  • Increasing the accuracy and completeness of Medicare Advantage encounter data
  • Evaluating patient functional assessment data reported by post-acute-care providers
  • Options for slowing the growth of Medicare fee-for-service spending for emergency department services
  • Options to increase the affordability of specialty drugs and biologics in Medicare Part D
  • Improving payment for low-volume and isolated outpatient dialysis facilities

Many of these issues are important to private safety-net hospitals.

MedPAC is an independent congressional agency that advises Congress on issues involving the Medicare program.  While its recommendations are not binding on either Congress or the administration, MedPAC is highly influential in governing circles and its recommendations often find their way into legislation, regulations, and new public policy.

Go here for links to the policy briefs and presentations that supported MedPAC’s discussion of these issues.