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Federal Health Policy Update for Wednesday, July 14

The following is the latest health policy news from the federal government as of 2:45 p.m. on Wednesday, July 14.  Some of the language used below is taken directly from government documents.

CMS – Proposed 2022 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule Rule

CMS has released its proposed Medicare physician fee schedule rule for 2022.  Highlights of the proposed rule, which is more than 1700 pages, include:

  • loosening current restrictions on the use of telehealth and expanding its use for behavioral health services;
  • expanding the reach of the Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program;
  • requiring clinicians to meet a higher performance threshold to receive incentives under the Quality Payment Program;
  • authorizing physician assistants to bill Medicare directly for the Part B services they provide; and
  • phasing out coinsurance for colorectal screening additional services.

In addition, CMS is soliciting stakeholder feedback on health equity data collection and on current Medicare payments for administering vaccines.

For further information about the proposed physician fee schedule rule, see the following resources:

CMS’s news release announcing the newly proposed rule

a CMS fact sheet

quality program update fact sheet

Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program update fact sheet

the proposed rule itself

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Health Policy News

  • CMS has published the latest edition of MLN Connects, its online weekly bulletin.  This week’s edition includes an article about cognitive assessment resources for providers, updated FY 2022 ICD-10-CMS codes, and opportunities for web-based training on aspects of Medicare billing.  For this and more, go here.
  • CMS has announced that it will open a National Coverage Determination (NCD) analysis through which it will review and determine whether Medicare will establish a national Medicare coverage policy for monoclonal antibodies targeting amyloid for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.  NCDs are program instructions developed by CMS to describe the nation-wide conditions for Medicare coverage for a specific item or service.  This NCD analysis will be applicable to national coverage considerations for aducanumab, which was recently approved by the FDA, as well as any future monoclonal antibodies that target amyloid for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.  As part of the NCD process, a 30-day public comment period began on July 12.  CMS will host two public listening sessions in July to provide an opportunity for public input.  Learn more from this CMS announcement.
  • CMS has announced that it will distribute $15 million in American Rescue Plan funding to provide community-based mobile crisis intervention services for those with Medicaid.  The $15 million funding opportunity is available to state Medicaid agencies, not providers, for planning grants to support developing these programs.
  • CMS’s Accountable Health Communities (AHC) Model assesses whether bridging the gap between clinical care and social services can reduce health care utilization and costs for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries.  In February 2021, CMS hosted its third annual AHC meeting virtually to convene 28 bridge organizations participating in the AHC model and key partners, including community service providers, state Medicaid agencies, and advisory board members.  Meeting participants collaborated and shared insights to sustain their screening, referral, and navigation strategies to address the health-related social needs of Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries.  Learn more about their insights in the brief “Planning for Sustainability and Advancing Health Equity during the Public Health Emergency.

Provider Relief Fund

Department of Health and Human Services

Health Policy News

  • HHS has provided $398 million in American Rescue Plan money through the Small Rural Hospital Improvement Program to 1540 small rural hospitals for COVID-19 testing and mitigation.  See the HHS announcement here, including a list of how much was distributed to hospitals in each state.
  • HHS’s Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) has published a notice in the Federal Register announcing the availability of complete lists of all geographic areas, population groups, and facilities designated as primary medical care, dental health, and mental health professional shortage areas (HPSAs) as of April 30, 2021.  See the HRSA notice here and find the updated lists of HPSAs here.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

COVID-19

Food and Drug Administration

COVID-19

Please note that the vaccine’s FAQ and separate fact sheets translated into other languages have not yet been updated.

Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission (MACPAC)

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

Office of Management and Budget (OMB)

  • OMB has published its semi-annual work plan presenting its regulatory priorities in the coming months.  Among the HHS matters listed, in addition to those that occur regularly, are:
    • Streamlining the Medicaid and CHIP Application, Eligibility Determination, Enrollment, and Renewal Processes
    • Medicaid Drug Misclassification, Beneficiary Access Protection, and Drug Program Administration
    • Mandatory Medicaid and CHIP Core Set Reporting
    • Medicaid Managed Care Risk-Sharing Mechanisms
    • Temporary Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) increase under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

See the complete HHS list here.

Stakeholder Events

Thursday, July 15 – Centers for Disease Control

CDC National Call Series on COVID-19-Related Response Strategies

Thursday, July 15 at 2:00 – 3:00 pm ET Click here to join
CDC’s COVID-19 response team conducts a national call weekly to provide state, tribal, local, and territorial (STLT) partners with timely updates and opportunities for peer-to-peer learning and sharing of successful response strategies. Over the summer, these weekly COVID-19 community of practice webinars will focus on topics related to school readiness.

Monday, July 19 – National Emergency Management Association (NEMA)

Mission-Ready Packages Workshop for Resource Providers

Monday, July 19 at 1:00 pm ET  Click here for registration

NEMA is hosting a workshop on developing mission ready packages (MRPs). MRPs are specific response or recovery capabilities that have been created to ensure the skills, capabilities, and associated costs are bundled prior to an emergency or disaster for more efficient deployment. These workshop sessions are designed for resource providers. A resource provider is any organization that is able to deploy under the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) and that has capabilities that might be needed during an emergency response. Previous knowledge of EMAC or MRPs is not required.

Tuesday, July 20 – Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)

Provider Relief Fund Reporting Requirements

Tuesday, July 20 at 3:00 pm ET

HRSA will host a recorded Reporting Technical Assistance session to provide technical assistance on reporting requirements for Provider Relief Fund recipients and stakeholders.  To register for the July 20 session go here.

Thursday, July 22 – HHS’s Health Sector Cybersecurity Coordination Center (HC3)
HC3
Cybersecurity Threat Briefing – Qbot/QakBot

Thursday, July 22 at 1:00 pm ET – Click here for registration

HC3 is holding its second July threat briefing, the topic will be “Qbot/QakBot.”  This webinar will provide actionable information on health sector cybersecurity threats and mitigations.  HC3 analysts will engage in discussions with participants on current threats and highlight best practices and mitigation tactics.

Wednesday, August 4 – Centers for Disease Control

Zoonoses and One Health Update (ZOHU) Call

Wednesday, August 4 at 2:00 – 3:00 pm ETClick here for more information

ZOHU Calls are one-hour monthly webinars that provide timely education on zoonotic and infectious diseases, One Health, antimicrobial resistance, food safety, vector-borne diseases, recent outbreaks, and related health threats at the animal-human-environment interface.

 

Federal Health Policy Update for Friday, July 9

The following is the latest health policy news from the federal government as of 2:45 p.m. on Friday, July 9.  Some of the language used below is taken directly from government documents.

White House

President Biden has issued an executive order “…to promote competition in the American economy, which will lower prices for families, increase wages for workers, and promote innovation and even faster economic growth.”  Among other things, the executive order calls for closer scrutiny of corporate consolidation, maintaining that such consolidation results in a “…lack of competition [that] drives up prices for consumers.  As fewer large players have controlled more of the market, mark-ups (charges over cost) have tripled.  Families are paying higher prices for necessities – things like prescription drugs, hearing aids, and internet service.”  The order also includes a provision that “… enforcement should focus in particular on labor markets, agricultural markets, healthcare markets (which includes prescription drugs, hospital consolidation, and insurance), and the tech sector.”

In a section on hospitals, the order notes that

Hospital consolidation has left many areas, especially rural communities, without good options for convenient and affordable healthcare service.  Thanks to unchecked mergers, the ten largest healthcare systems now control a quarter of the market.  Since 2010, 139 rural hospitals have shuttered, including a high of 19 last year, in the middle of a healthcare crisis.  Research shows that hospitals in consolidated markets charge far higher prices than hospitals in markets with several competitors.

It also

  • Underscores that hospital mergers can be harmful to patients and encourages the Justice Department and FTC to review and revise their merger guidelines to ensure patients are not harmed by such mergers.
  • Directs HHS to support existing hospital price transparency rules and to finish implementing bipartisan federal legislation to address surprise hospital billing.

Learn more from the White House fact sheet on the executive order, which addresses other aspects of health care as well.

Provider Relief Fund

  • The Provider Relief Fund’s “Reporting Requirements and Auditing” page has been updated with new information about Provider Relief Fund recipient reporting deadlines, requirements, and worksheets.  Find it here.
  • The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will host recorded Reporting Technical Assistance Sessions to provide technical assistance on reporting requirements for Provider Relief Fund recipients and stakeholders.  For the July 14 session at 3:00 p.m., go here to register and for the July 20 session at 3:00 go here to register.

Department of Health and Human Services

COVID-19

  • HHS has published notice of the extension of the designation issued on February 1, 2021 identifying health and medical resources necessary to respond to the spread of COVID-19 that are scarce or the supply of which would be threatened by excessive accumulation by people or entities not needing the excess supplies.  These designated materials are subject to the hoarding prevention measures authorized under Executive Order 13910 and section 102 of the Defense Production Act of 1950.  Learn more from the Federal Register notice.  The notice lists specific items that have had their “scarce” designation removed and others that have not.  The action took effect on July 1 and interested parties have until August 7 to submit comments.

Health Policy News

  • HHS has updated interoperability standards to support the collection and electronic exchange of data on sexual orientation, gender identity, and social determinants of health.  Learn more from HHS’s announcement about this development and from the United States Core Data for Interoperability version 2 (USCDI v2), a standardized set of health data classes and constituent data elements for nation-wide, interoperable health information exchange.
  • HHS’s Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response has shared a notice from the federal Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency and the FBI about how multiple managed service providers and their customers can protect themselves from recent supply-chain ransomware attacks leveraging a vulnerability in Kaseya VSA software.  Learn more here.
  • HHS’s Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response has developed an infectious disease surge annex tabletop exercise toolkit that can be used by health care coalitions to enhance operational area awareness and capability to effectively address the needs of patients seeking care following exposure to an infectious agent.  Health care coalitions are not required to use this template but it can be used to satisfy funding opportunity announcement requirements for the hospital preparedness program cooperative agreement.  Find the toolkit and links to other resources here.
  • The same HHS office has prepared a home care and hospice emergency operations plan that includes emergency operations plans specific to home care and hospice agencies.

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services

Health Policy News

  • CMS has published the latest edition of MLN Connects, its online weekly bulletin.  This week’s edition includes an updated FAQ about repayment of COVID-19 accelerated and advance payments, including information about how recoupment works and how it affects providers’ Medicare claims payment amounts.  For this and more, including articles on updated HCPCS codes for skilled nursing facilities and updated durable medical equipment, prosthetics, orthotics, and supplies, go here.
  • CMS has announced the appointment of Dr. Meena Seshamani, M.D., Ph.D. as Deputy Administrator and Director of Center for Medicare.  Dr. Seshamani most recently served as vice president of clinical care transformation at MedStar Health, where she conceptualized, designed, and implemented population health and value-based care initiatives and served on the senior leadership of a health system with 10 hospitals and more than 300 outpatient sites.  Prior to MedStar Health, she was director of the Office of Health Reform at HHS.  Dr. Seshamani received her B.A. with honors in business economics from Brown University, her M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and her Ph.D. in health economics from the University of Oxford.  Learn more from the CMS announcement of the appointment.
  • The CMS Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation’s Financial Alignment Initiative is designed to provide individuals dually enrolled in Medicare and Medicaid with a better care experience and to better align the financial incentives of the Medicare and Medicaid programs.  Through this initiative, CMS partners with states to test new models for their effectiveness in accomplishing these goals.  Now, the innovation center has posted evaluation and savings reports from participating states Washington, Colorado, Minnesota, New York, and Virginia.  Find those reports and other information about the program here.

COVID-19

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

COVID-19

Americans who have been fully vaccinated do not need a booster shot at this time. FDA, CDC, and NIH are engaged in a science-based, rigorous process to consider whether or when a booster might be necessary. This process takes into account laboratory data, clinical trial data, and cohort data – which can include data from specific pharmaceutical companies, but does not rely on those data exclusively. We continue to review any new data as it becomes available and will keep the public informed. We are prepared for booster doses if and when the science demonstrates that they are needed.

Food and Drug Administration

COVID-19

  • The FDA has authorized the use, under the emergency use authorization for the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine, of an additional batch of vaccine drug substance manufactured at the Emergent facility.  Questions had been raised about the safety of the batch but the FDA has investigated and concluded it is safe.  See the FDA announcement of this decision here and the letter the FDA sent to JanssenBiotech explaining its decision.

Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission (MACPAC)

  • MACPAC has responded to the Office of Management and Budget request for information “Methods and Leading Practices for Advancing Equity and Support for Underserved Communities Through Government” with a letter that highlights opportunities for CMS and state agencies that jointly operate Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to document specific disparities in health care and develop new opportunities to improve access to and the quality of care beneficiaries receive.  The letter also outlines areas that could be addressed through subregulatory guidance, waiver opportunities, and technical assistance.  Learn more from the MACPAC letter to OMB.

National Institutes of Health

Stakeholder Events

Tuesday, July 13 – Food and Drug Administration

The FDA will host a webinar to share information and answer questions about its revocation of EUAs for non-NIOSH-approved respirators and decontamination systems.  It will present information about its June 30, 2021 “Update:  FDA No Longer Authorizes Use of Non-NIOSH-Approved or Decontaminated Disposable Respirators – Letter to Health Care Personnel and Facilities.”  To join the webinar:

Zoom Webinar Link: https://fda.zoomgov.com/j/1600971341?pwd=UTJMTlZmYzVScmNZamd2d2J4SU92Zz09

Webinar Passcode: $vrC6z

Dial: 833-568-8864
Webinar ID: 160 097 1341
Passcode: 292602

Tuesday, July 13 Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC)
ONC Workshop: Advancing SDOH Data Use and Interoperability for Achieving Health Equity
Tuesday, July 13 at 10:00 am – 4:00 pm ET  Click here for connection information
This workshop will explore existing and emerging data standards, tools, approaches, policies, models, and interventions for advancing the use and interoperability of non-clinical health data for individual and community health improvement.  It will share varying perspectives of health policy-makers and health improvement implementers to highlight inventive solutions, share challenges, and offer ideas on data modernization to advance health equity.  The workshop offers introductory content as well as deep exploration of key topics as part of social determinants of health IT data use and interoperability including facilitated, expert stakeholder engagement.

Wednesday, July 14 and Tuesday, July 20 – Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)

HRSA will host recorded Reporting Technical Assistance Sessions to provide technical assistance on reporting requirements for Provider Relief Fund recipients and stakeholders.  For the July 14 session at 3:00 p.m. go here to register and for the July 20 session at 3:00 p.m. go here to register.

MACPAC Meets

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission met for two days last week in Washington, D.C.

The following is MACPAC’s own summary of the sessions.

MACPAC kicked off its April meeting with a review of a draft chapter for the June 2021 report to Congress and recommendations on addressing high-cost specialty drugs. Since 2017, the Commission has been working to identify potential models that could help states address the challenges of high prices. The presentation focused on drugs that have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) under the accelerated approval pathway. Such approvals are based on whether the drug has an effect on a surrogate endpoint that is reasonably likely to predict a clinical benefit; however, unlike under the traditional pathway, the clinical benefit has yet to be verified.

On Friday, the Commission voted to approve two recommendations* that address Medicaid payment for such drugs. The recommendations would increase the rebates under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program on accelerated approval drugs until these drugs have verified the clinical benefit. Once the FDA converts the drugs to traditional approval, the rebates would revert back to the standard amounts.

Commissioners then turned their attention to ways states can integrate care through Medicare Advantage dual eligible special needs plans (D-SNPs) using contract authority under the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008 (MIPPA, P.L. 110-275). The draft chapter for the June report describes why MACPAC is focused on D-SNPs, MIPPA strategies available to states, state ability to use these strategies, and MACPAC’s plans for future work on specific strategies that if made mandatory could give further momentum to state efforts.

The Commission then discussed two additional draft chapters for the June 2021 report related to behavioral health services. Staff presented a draft chapter and recommendations on improving access to mental health services for adult Medicaid beneficiaries, followed by a draft chapter and recommendations on improving access to behavioral health services for children and youth.

Commissioners on Friday approved recommendations* that call on the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to:

  • direct relevant agencies to issue joint subregulatory guidance that addresses how Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) can be used to fund a crisis continuum for beneficiaries experiencing behavioral health crises;
  • direct a coordinated effort to provide education, technical assistance, and planning support to expand access to such services;
  • direct relevant agencies to issue joint subregulatory guidance that addresses the design and implementation of benefits for children and adolescents with significant mental health conditions covered by Medicaid and CHIP; and
  • direct a coordinated effort to provide education, technical assistance, and planning support to expand access to such services.

After a break on Thursday, Commissioners discussed a draft chapter for the June 2021 report to Congress on how electronic health records (EHRs) can be used to strengthen clinical integration and improve patient care.  Adoption of EHRs remains low among behavioral health providers. The chapter provides an overview of MACPAC’s work to date on clinical integration for behavioral and  physical health services, and discusses how data-sharing can improve the quality of care for beneficiaries with behavioral health conditions. It concludes by identifying ways to strengthen EHR uptake among Medicaid’s behavioral health providers.

Next, Commissioners reviewed a draft chapter on non-emergency medical transportation (NEMT). In recent years, policymakers at the state and federal levels have begun to re-examine this benefit. As part of a congressionally mandated request, MACPAC conducted a multi-pronged study of NEMT that will be published as a chapter in the June 2021 report to Congress. This presentation included the key findings of MACPAC’s study and an overview of the topics covered in the draft chapter.

On Friday, the day kicked off with a discussion of the challenges that states face in providing more care through home- and community-based services (HCBS). As of fiscal year (FY) 2018, HCBS spending as a percentage of long-term services and supports spending remained under 50 percent in 18 states and the District of Columbia. To understand why some states have made less progress in rebalancing, MACPAC contracted with RTI International and the Center for Healthcare Strategies. This presentation summarized the results of the work, as well as proposed policy considerations.

The Commission then heard a staff presentation on key Medicaid and CHIP managed care quality requirements, as well as quality improvement and measurement activities conducted by states, plans, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Staff also provided a summary of preliminary findings on state performance over time on selected core set measures and managed care plan performance on performance improvement projects, which suggest the effectiveness of these efforts is unclear. Staff and Commissioners identified potential areas for future MACPAC work related to quality of care in Medicaid and CHIP.

After the Commission voted on several recommendations, staff provided an update on the current state of Transformed Medicaid Statistical Information System (T-MSIS) data submissions and MACPAC’s work to validate and analyze the data. MACPAC found that data submissions have improved since 2016, but some challenges remain.

The meeting concluded with a panel discussion about Medicaid’s use of telehealth services, which expanded during the COVID-19 pandemic. Commissioners heard from Chethan Bachireddy, chief medical officer for the Virginia Department of Medical Assistance Services; Tracy Johnson, Medicaid director for the Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing; and Sara Salek, chief medical officer for the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System. Panelists described the use of telehealth during the pandemic, considerations for post-pandemic telehealth policies, and challenges to the use and adoption of telehealth in Medicaid and how these states are addressing them.

*All recommendations were approved as presented in draft.

Supporting the discussion were the following briefing papers:

  1. High-Cost Specialty Drugs Review of Draft Chapter and Recommendations
  2. Strategies for State Contracts with Dual Eligible Special Needs Plans
  3. Access to Mental Health Services for Adults: Draft Chapter and Recommendations
  4. Access to Behavioral Health Services for Children and Adolescents: Draft Chapter and Recommendations
  5. Electronic Health Records as a Tool for Integration of Behavioral Health Services
  6. Mandated Report: Non-Emergency Medical Transportation Benefit
  7. Progress on Rebalancing: Lessons from States
  8. Ensuring Medicaid and CHIP Quality
  9. Update on Transformed Medicaid Statistical Information System (T-MSIS)
  10. Panel Discussion: What States are Learning from Expanded Use of Telehealth

Because they serve so many Medicaid and CHIP patients – more than the typical hospital – MACPAC’s deliberations are especially important to private safety-net hospitals.

MACPAC is a non-partisan legislative branch agency that provides policy and data analysis and makes recommendations to Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department  of Health and Human Services, and the states on a wide variety of issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.  Find its web site here.

MACPAC Issues Recommendations to Congress

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission has submitted its annual report to Congress on Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program.

The report includes recommendations for:

  • improving Medicaid’s responsiveness during economic downturns
  • addressing concerns about high rates of maternal morbidity and mortality;
  • reexamining Medicaid’s estate recovery policies
  • integrating care for people who are dually eligible for Medicaid and Medicare
  • improving hospital payment policy for the nation’s safety-net hospitals

MACPAC is a non-partisan legislative branch agency that “provides policy and data analysis and makes recommendations to Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the states on a wide array of issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).”  Its mandate calls for it to address matters such as Medicaid and CHIP payment, eligibility, enrollment and retention, coverage, access to care, quality of care, and the programs’ interaction with Medicare and the health care system generally.

Because safety-net hospitals care for so many more Medicaid and CHIP participants than the typical community hospital, MACPAC’s deliberations are especially important to them.

Learn more about MACPAC’s recommendations in its Report to Congress on Medicaid and CHIP.

MACPAC Looks at Recipients of Provider Relief Fund Grants

What kinds of providers did and did not receive grants from the CARES Act’s Provider Relief Fund?  What were the obstacles to receiving those COVID-19 relief grants and why did some providers fare better in the distribution of Provider Relief Fund resources than others?

These questions and more are addressed in “COVID Relief Funding for Medicaid Providers,” a new analysis released by the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission.

MACPAC Meets

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission met for two days last week in Washington, D.C.

The following is MACPAC’s own summary of the sessions.

The October 2020 MACPAC meeting opened with a panel discussion on restarting Medicaid eligibility redeterminations when the public health emergency ends.  It included Jennifer Wagner, director of Medicaid eligibility and enrollment at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities; René Mollow, deputy director for health care benefits and eligibility at the California Department of Health Care Services; and Lee Guice, director of policy and operations at the Department for Medicaid Services, Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services.

After a break, Commissioners heard a panel discussion with Kevin Prindiville, executive director at Justice in Aging; Mark Miller, executive vice president of healthcare at Arnold Ventures; and Charlene Frizzera, senior advisor at Leavitt Partners, on creating a new program for dually eligible beneficiaries. Later, staff presented preliminary findings from a mandated report on non-emergency medical transportation. The day concluded with a report on nursing facility acuity adjustment methods.

On Friday, the day began with a session on access to mental health services for adults in Medicaid. It was followed by a related panel discussion on mental health services with Sandra Wilkniss, director of complex care policy and senior fellow at Families USA; Melisa Byrd, senior deputy director for the District of Columbia Department of Health Care Finance; and Dorn Schuffman, director of the CCBHC Demonstration Project at the Missouri Department of Mental Health.

Next, the Commission considered the merits of extending Medicaid coverage for pregnant women beyond 60 days postpartum. Staff then provided an update on a statutorily required analysis of disproportionate share hospital (DSH) allotments, as well as an analysis of addressing high-cost drugs and the challenges they present to Medicaid.

The meeting concluded with comment on the Secretary’s report to Congress on Reducing Barriers to Furnishing Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Services Using Telehealth and Remote Patient Monitoring for Pediatric Populations under Medicaid. The Commission decided to send a letter to Congress and the Secretary commenting on this report.

Supporting the discussion were the following briefing papers:

  1. Mandated Report on Non-Emergency Medical Transportation: Work Plan and Preliminary Findings
  2. Changes in Nursing Facility Acuity Adjustment Methods
  3. Access to Mental Health Services for Adults in Medicaid
  4. Considerations in Extending Postpartum Coverage
  5. Required Annual Analysis of Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) Allotments
  6. Addressing High-Cost Drugs and Pipeline Analysis
  7. Comment on Secretary’s Report to Congress on Reducing Barriers to Substance Use Disorder Services Using Telehealth for Pediatric Populations under Medicaid

Because they serve so many Medicaid and CHIP patients – more than the typical hospital – MACPAC’s deliberations are especially important to private safety-net hospitals.

MACPAC is a non-partisan legislative branch agency that provides policy and data analysis and makes recommendations to Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department  of Health and Human Services, and the states on a wide variety of issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.  Find its web site here.

MACPAC Meets

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission met for two days last week in Washington, D.C.

The following is MACPAC’s own summary of the sessions.

The February 2020 MACPAC meeting opened with a continuation of MACPAC’s examination of Medicaid’s role in maternal health, when Medicaid officials from Michigan, New Jersey, and North Carolina joined the Commission to discuss how their states are addressing maternal morbidity and mortality.* The Commission plans to include a chapter on maternal health in its June 2020 report to Congress. Commissioners later turned their attention to policy options for improving enrollment in the Medicare Savings Program.

The Commission later took a deep dive into value-based payment in Medicaid managed care. This three-part session began with findings from a series of interviews with state officials, managed care organizations, and other stakeholders aimed at understanding how states use managed care to promote payment reform, conducted by MACPAC contractor Bailit Health. Then, representatives from three of these organizations shared their reactions to the findings and talked about how value-based payment models are working in practice.* The session concluded with Commissioners’ perspectives on the study’s findings and the panelists’ reactions to them, and possible next steps.

The final session of the afternoon continued a line of inquiry begun at the October 2019 meeting: third-party liability coordination between Medicaid and TRICARE. MACPAC estimates that almost 1 million Medicaid enrollees have primary coverage through TRICARE, which provides health benefits for military personnel, military retirees, and their dependents. Commissioners explored making recommendations in the June report to improve coordination between the two programs.

On Friday, the Commission returned to the theme of improving care for dually eligible beneficiaries, looking more closely at the rise of so-called dual-eligible special needs plan (D-SNP) look-alikes and how changes in the Medicare Advantage market are affecting efforts to integrate care. Commissioners also reviewed a rule proposed in February that would, among other things, restrict the growth of look-alikes.

Following that session, the Commission discussed draft recommendations to improve integration of Medicare and Medicaid benefits for dually eligible beneficiaries. The February meeting wrapped up with a discussion of a forthcoming rule expected to affect the Medicaid eligibility determination process.

Supporting the discussion were the following briefing papers:

  1. State Medicaid Initiatives to Improve Maternal Health
  2. Improving Participation in the Medicare Savings Programs: Decisions on Draft Recommendations for the June Report to Congress
  3. State Strategies to Promote the Use of Value-Based Payments in Medicaid Managed Care
  4. Medicaid and TRICARE: Third-Party Liability Coordination
  5. How Changes in the Medicare Advantage Market Are Affecting Integration of Care for Dually Eligible Beneficiaries: Analysis and Comments on Proposed Rule
  6. Improving Integrated Care for Dually Eligible Beneficiaries: Decisions on Recommendations to be Included in June Report to Congress
  7. Forthcoming Rule on Program Integrity and Eligibility Determination Processes

Because they serve so many Medicaid and CHIP patients – more than the typical hospital – MACPAC’s deliberations are especially important to private safety-net hospitals.

MACPAC is a non-partisan legislative branch agency that provides policy and data analysis and makes recommendations to Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department  of Health and Human Services, and the states on a wide variety of issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.  Find its web site here.

MACPAC Looks at Medicaid DSH

At a time when cuts in Medicaid disproportionate share hospital payments (Medicaid DSH) are still scheduled for the current fiscal year and some in Congress are calling for a new approach to allotting DSH funds among the states, the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission has released its annual analysis of Medicaid DSH allotments to the states.

The report includes:

  • data about changes in the uninsured rate
  • demographic information about the uninsured
  • information about the cost of hospital uncompensated care
  • perspectives on hospital Medicaid shortfalls
  • a comparison of hospital uncompensated care costs when calculated using different methodologies
  • data about hospitals that provide “essential community services”
  • information about scheduled Medicaid DSH allotment reductions

All private safety-net hospitals receive Medicaid DSH payments and consider the program an essential tool for serving their communities.

MACPAC will issue a more complete report to Congress in March of 2020.

Learn more about how MACPAC views Medicaid DSH at a time when the program is scheduled to change – and when some want even more change – in the new MACPAC document “Required Analyses of Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) Allotments.”

 

MACPAC Meets

The Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission met for two days last week in Washington, D.C.

The following is MACPAC’s own summary of the sessions.

The Commission devoted its Thursday morning discussion to integration of care for beneficiaries who are dually eligible for Medicaid and Medicare. Panelists Amber Christ, directing attorney at Justice in Aging; Griffin Myers, chief medical officer at Oak Street Health; and Michael Monson, senior vice president for Medicaid and complex care at Centene, presented beneficiary, provider, and health plan perspectives and a question and answer session followed.

After lunch, MACPAC staff briefed the Commission on challenges states face as they prepare for mandatory reporting of quality measures for children enrolled in Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and behavioral health measures for adults enrolled in Medicaid. Immediately following that session, the Commission reviewed a new MACPAC-commissioned study on the effects of federal legislation that provided new buprenorphine prescribing authority for nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

After a brief break, MACPAC staff updated the Commission on the status of the Transformed Medicaid Statistical Information System (T-MSIS). The final Thursday session discussed disproportionate share hospital (DSH) allotments as required in MACPAC’s annual March reports to Congress.

MACPAC’s Friday agenda opened with a session on improving Medicaid policies related to third-party liability: specifically, coordination of benefits with TRICARE, the health coverage program for active duty military and their dependents. There are close to 1 million Medicaid beneficiaries with TRICARE coverage but Medicaid’s ability to collect from TRICARE is limited. The final session of the October meeting addressed Medicaid and maternal health.

Supporting the discussion were the following briefing papers:

  1. State Readiness to Report Mandatory Core Set Measures
  2. Analysis of Buprenorphine Prescribing Patterns among Advanced Practitioners in Medicaid
  3. Update on Transformed Medicaid Statistical Information System (T-MSIS)
  4. Required Analyses of Disproportionate Share Hospital (DSH) Allotments
  5. Improving Medicaid Policies Related to Third-Party Liability
  6. Medicaid and Maternal Health: Work Plan and Further Discussion

MACPAC is a non-partisan legislative branch agency that provides policy and data analysis and makes recommendations to Congress, the Secretary of the U.S. Department  of Health and Human Services, and the states on a wide variety of issues affecting Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program.  MACPAC’s deliberations are especially important to private safety-net hospitals because those hospitals care for especially large numbers of Medicaid patients.  Find MACPAC’s web site here.

MACPAC Looks at Medicaid Substance Abuse Treatment

The treatment of substance abuse problems with medication within the Medicaid population is the subject of a new report by the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission.

As required by the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act, which was enacted last year, MACPAC has prepared a report on how selected states administer and regulate the use of medications used to treat opioid and alcohol use disorders.

Among its findings:

  • The frequency with which providers are prescribing medication to treat opioid and alcohol use disorders has exploded in recent years.
  • States are starting to eliminate prior authorization for such prescriptions.
  • But states still apply utilization management practices to such medications more frequently than they do for counseling for the same problems.
  • States are becoming more likely to limit the quantities and doses that providers can prescribe at one time.
  • More states are requiring providers to check prescription drug monitoring programs before prescribing medications to treat opioid and alcohol use disorders.

Private safety-net hospitals typically care for especially large numbers of  patients with opioid and alcohol use disorders who are insured by Medicaid.

Learn more about MACPAC’s findings in its new report “MACPAC Examines Access to Medication-Assisted Treatment under Medicaid.”